Dr. Michael Mascagni

Curriculum Vitae

| Biographical Information | Research and Creative Activity | Teaching and Training | Service |

Biographical Information

Name: Michael V. A. Mascagni

Birth Date: on request

Birthplace: Bologna, Italy with given name Michele V. A. Mascagni

Citizenship: United States of America, Repubblica Italiana

Postal Contact Information:

Department of Computer Science Department of Scientific Computing
Florida State University Florida State University
253 Love Building, 1017 Academic Way
400 Dirac Science Library
Tallahassee, FL 32306-4530  USA Tallahassee, FL 32306-4120  USA






Electronic Contact Information:

Office Telephone: +1.850.644.3290 (207A LOV), +1.609.77SPRNG (498 DSL)
Facsimile: +1.850.644.0058
E-mail: mascagni@fsu.edu or mascagni@nist.gov or mascagni@math.ethz.ch
Homepage:  http://www.cs.fsu.edu/~mascagni



 

 

Academic Degrees:

Ph.D., Mathematics, October, 1987
Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY; Dissertation Title: Negative Feedback in Neural Networks; Prof. Charles Peskin, Major Professor
M.S., Mathematics, October 1984
Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University
B.S., Mathematics, with Highest Distinction, December 1981
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA; Minor in Biological Sciences (formerly Zoology)
B.S.E., Biomedical Engineering, with Highest Distinction, May 1981
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Awards:

2008
Fulbright Senior Specialist Roster, Council for International Exchange of Scholars, Washington, DC
2001
Developing Scholar (Associate Professor Research) Award, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
1988-1989
National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship used at Mathematical Research Branch, N.I.D.D.K., National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

Academic Positions:

Summer 2013
Visiting Professor: Université de Toulon et du Var, Institut des Sciences de l'Ingénieur de Toulon et du Var, Modélisation Numérique et Couplages, Toulon, France; Prof. Sylvain Maire, Sponsor
November 2011-Present
Member of the Faculty: Graduate Program in Molecular Biophysics, Florida State University, Institute of Molecular Biophysics, Tallahassee, FL; Prof. Richard Bertram, Sponsor
Summer 2007
Visiting Professor: Université de Toulon et du Var, Institut des Sciences de l'Ingénieur de Toulon et du Var, Modélisation Numérique et Couplages, Toulon, France; Prof. Sylvain Maire, Sponsor
Wintersemester 2005-06 - Sommersemeter 2006
Gastprofessor, Seminar für Angewandte Mathematik, Departement Mathematik, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich, Switzerland; Prof. Dr. Rolf Jeltsch, Seminar Head, Prof. Dr. Wesley Petersen, Academic Host
2002-Present
Professor, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL; Dr. Xin Yuan, Chair
Sommersemeter 2002
Gastprofessor, Institut für Scientific Computing, Universität Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria; Prof. Dr. Peter Zinterhof, Chair
2001-Present
Professor, Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL; Dr. Michael H. Peters, Chair (Courtesy)
1999-Present
Professor, Department of Mathematics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL; Dr. Phillip Bowers, Chair (Courtesy)
1999-Present
Professor, Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL; Dr. Max Gunzburger, Director (Courtesy)
1999-2002
Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL; Dr. Ted Baker, Chair
1997-1999
Director, University of Southern Mississippi/Center of Higher Learning Naval Oceanographic Office/Programming Environment and Training Research Program, Stennis Space Center, MS; Dr. Peter Ranelli, Technical Director, Center of Higher Learning
1997-1999
Coordinator, Ph.D. Program in Scientific Computing and Associate Professor of Mathematics: University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS; Dr. Grayson Rayborn, Director, School of Mathematical Sciences
1997-1999
Associate Professor, Department of Mathematics, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS; Dr. Wallace Pye, Chairman
May 1996
Visiting Professor: Dipartimento di Metodi e Modelli Matematici per le Scienze Applicate (DMMMSA), Università degli Studi di Padova, Padova, Italy; Prof. Renato Spigler, Sponsor
1994-1995
Adjunct Professor: Georgetown University Department of Computer Science, Washington, D.C.; Dr. Timothy Law Snyder, Chair
1987
Adjunct Professor: Dept. of Computer Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY
1981-1983
Graduate Fellow in Biophysics; The Rockefeller University, New York, NY; Dr. Robert Shapley, Advisor

Other Professional Positions:

2014-Present
Guest Researcher: Laboratory for Biological Modeling, National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD; Dr. Arthur Sherman, Lab Chief
2013-Present
Faculty Appointee: Applied and Computational Mathematics Division, Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Dr. Ronald Boisvert, Division Chief
1989-1996
Research Staff Member: Center for Computing Sciences (formerly Supercomputing Research Center), Institute for Defense Analyses, Bowie, MD; Dr. Francis Sullivan, Director
1987-1996
NIH-NRC Research Associate/Guest Worker: Mathematical Research Branch, National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD; Dr. John Rinzel, Advisor
1996
Visiting Researcher: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD; Dr. Judy Devaney, Sponsor
Summer 1995
Visiting Scientist: Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS), NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA; Dr. Robert Schreiber, Sponsor
Summer 1984
Courant Institute/IBM Summer Student: Department of Mathematical Sciences, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY; Dr. Willard Miranker, Advisor
Summer 1983
Summer Student in Numerical Weather Prediction: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD; Dr. Eugenia Kalnay and Mr. Dean Duffy, Advisors
 
Professional Society Memberships:
 
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
International Association for Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (IMACS)
Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM)
Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Supercomputing (SC) Activity Group
Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) Activity Group
Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE)
Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), Computer Society
The Speedup Society, The Swiss Forum for Grid and High-Performance Computing

Honor Society Memberships:

Phi Beta Kappa (National Liberal Arts Honor Society), Iowa Alpha Chapter
Tau Beta Pi (National Engineering Honor Society), Iowa Beta Chapter
Upsilon Pi Epsilon (International Honor Society for the Computing and Information Disciplines), Florida State University Chapter

Other Honors:

2011-Present
          Distinguished Scientist, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
2009-Present
          Senior Member, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
2005-Present

          Member, Board of Directors, International Association for Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (IMACS)
2005-Present
          Member, Technical Committee on Monte Carlo Methods, International Association for Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (IMACS)
2004-Present
          Marquis Who's Who, Who's Who in Computational Science and Engineering
1999-Present

          Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) Visiting Lecturer
1986-1987
         
New York University, College of Arts and Science, New York, NY, Dean's Dissertation Fellowship
1983-1984
         
New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York,  NY, Computational Fluid Dynamics Fellowship


Research and Creative Activity

Research Interests:

Books:

  1. A. Rasulov, M. Mascagni, G. Raimova, (2006),  Monte Carlo Methods  for the Solution of Linear and Nonlinear Boundary Value Problems, University of World Economics and Diplomacy Press, Tashkent, Uzbekistan, (in English), 347 pages.  This monograph focuses on the development and analysis of Monte Carlo methods for partial differential equations and integral equations.  Besides presenting results for linear problems, a considerable amount of time is spent on nonlinear problems, usually through their integral equation representations.

Refereed Chapters in Edited Volumes:

  1. Y. Li and M. Mascagni (2006), "An Overview of Grid-Based Monte Carlo Computing," Grid Technologies, Emerging from Distributed Architectures to Virtual Organizations, WIT Press, ISBN: 978-1-84564-055-2, M. P. Bekakos, G. A. Gravvanis and H. R. Arabnia, editors, pp. 391-421.  This paper provides an overview of computational infrastructure for parallel, distributed, and Grid-based Monte Carlo computations.  The starting point is the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators (SPRNG) Library, and its uses for parallel and distributed Monte Carlo, and the discussion continues with a description of our Grid-Computing Infrastructure for Monte Carlo Applications (GCIMCA), and an extension of this point-of-view to workflows.  The paper then continues with consideration of quasi-Monte Carlo and the differences that arise in computing in this manner on the Grid with quasirandom numbers.  The work concludes with a summary and many open problems.
  2. C.-O. Hwang, J. A. Given, and M. Mascagni (2004), "First- and Last-Passage Algorithms for Diffusion Monte Carlo," New Vistas in Statistical Physics: Applications in Econophysics, Bioinformatics, and Pattern Recognition, L. T. Wille, editor, Springer Verlag: Berlin/New York, pp.  47-65.  This invited review paper summarizes first- and last-passage methods developed by our research group for solving problems in electrostatics, material science, and biochemistry.
  3. C.-O. Hwang, M. Mascagni and N. A. Simonov (2003), Monte Carlo Methods for the Linearized Poisson-Boltzmann Equation, Advances in Numerical Analysis, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., Hauppauge, NY, 20 pages.  This paper reviews several methods for the solution of the linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation via Monte Carlo methods.  In addition, the effectiveness of the various methods are illustrated on several examples.  Finally, one of the methods is applied to a complex application where the solution is used in a biochemical setting.  The Poisson-Boltzmann equation is becoming more important in applications where biomolecules are studied in solution.
  4. M. Mascagni (2003), "Random Number Generation," in CRC Standard Mathematical Tables and Formulae 31st Edition, D. Zwillinger, editor, Chapman and Hall/CRC, Boca Raton, pp. 644-649.  This invited chapter gives a review of the use of pseudorandom numbers to produce uniform real and integer variables and how to transform them into nonuniform distribution.  The volume where this chapter appears is a widely used reference for Mathematics and computational technique.
  5. M. Mascagni (2003), "Deterministic Monte Carlo Methods and Parallelism," Sourcebook on Parallel Computing, J. Dongarra, I. Foster, F. Fox, W. Gropp, K. Kennedy, L. Torcson, and A. White, editors, Morgan Kaufman Publishers, San Francisco, pp. 249-258.  This invited review of parallel quasi-Monte Carlo methods provides an overview of the subject and some new results for single eigenvalue computations.  This work is part of the summary document to be produced by the NSF funded Center for Research in Parallel Computing.
  6. A. Srinivasan, D. M. Ceperley, and M. Mascagni (1999), "Random Number Generators for Parallel Applications," in Monte Carlo Methods in Chemical Physics, D. M. Ferguson, J. I. Siepmann, and D. G. Truhlar, editors, Advances in Chemical Physics Series, Volume 105, John Wiley and Sons, New York, pp. 13-36.  This invited review presents an overview of parallel random number generation and the SPRNG library for the Monte Carlo community working in Physical Chemistry and Molecular Physics.
  7. M. Mascagni (1999), "Serial and Parallel Random Number Generation," in Quantum Monte Carlo in Physics and Chemistry, P. Nightingale and C. Umrigar, editors, Springer-Verlag: New York, Berlin, pp. 277-288.  This invited review presents an overview of parallel random number generation and the SPRNG library for the Quantum Monte Carlo community.  This paper was presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Quantum Monte Carlo Methods in Physics and Chemistry.
  8. M. Mascagni (1997), "Some Methods of Parallel Pseudorandom Number Generation," in Algorithms for Parallel Processing, R. Schreiber, M. Heath and A. Ranade editors, Springer Verlag: New York, Berlin, pp. 277-288.  This invited review presents the discrete mathematics and number theory behind the use of parameterized pseudorandom number generators in parallel.  This paper was presented at the Institute for Mathematics and Its Applications during a special year in High Performance Computing Workshop on Algorithms for Parallel Processing.
  9. M. Mascagni and A. Sherman (1996), "Numerical Methods for Neuronal Modeling," in Methods of Neuronal Modeling: From Ions to Networks, Second Edition, C. Koch and I. Segev editors, MIT Press: Cambridge, Massachusetts, pp. 569-606.  This invited review is a second edition update of the review done in 1989 that is listed below.
  10. M. Mascagni (1996), "Parallel Wiener Integral Methods for Elliptic Boundary Value Problems: A Tale of Two Architectures," in Applications on Advanced Architecture Computers.  This invited chapter looks at SIMD and MIMD implementations of random walk based Monte Carlo algorithms for the solution of elliptic boundary value problems.
  11. M. Mascagni (1996), "Random Number Generation," in CRC Standard Mathematical Tables and Formulae 30th Edition, D. Zwillinger, editor, pp. 593-598.  This invited chapter gives a review of the use of pseudorandom numbers to produce uniform real and integer variables and how to transform them into nonuniform distribution.  The volume where this chapter appears is a widely used reference for Mathematics and Computational technique.
  12. M. Mascagni (1989), "Numerical Methods for Neuronal Modeling," in Methods of Neuronal Modeling: From to Networks to Ions, C. Koch and I. Segev editors, MIT Press: Cambridge, pp. 439-484.  This invited chapter reviews numerical methods for the solution of problems that arise in the quantitative simulation of the nervous system.  It presents finite-difference methods for the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations that arise, as well as methods for solving neural network type systems.  This chapter was based on material the author developed for the Methods in Computational Neuroscience course taught at the Marine Biological Laboratory for four summers.

Refereed International Journal Papers:

  1. T. D. Anderson and Michael Mascagni (2015), "Memory Efficient Lagged-Fibonacci Random Number Generators for GPU Supercomputing," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 21(2): 163-174.  In this paper, we discuss our implementation of memory efficient, integer, cycle-split, additive and multiplicative LFGs for both CUDA and OpenCL. The latter LFG has been implemented neither for GPUs nor as a cycle-split parallel generator before. We also discuss portability and reproducibility between CPUs and GPUs.
  2. Y.-W. Jung and Michael Mascagni (2014), "Constriction Model of Actomyosin Ring for Cytokinesis by Fission Yeast using a Two-state Sliding Filament Mechanism," Journal of Chemical Physics141: 125101, 14 pages.  In this paper we develop a model describing the structure and contractile mechanism of the actomyosin ring in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The proposed ring includes actin, myosin, and alpha-actinin, and is organized into a structure similar to that of muscle sarcomeres.
  3. M. Mascagni, Y. Qiu, L.-Y. Hin (2014), "High performance computing in quantitative finance: A pseudo-random number generator perspective," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 20(2): 101-120.  This paper studies different PPRNGs strategies, comparing their performance in statistical tests and application-based tests.  It then considers the potential impact of inter-thread correlation and intra-thread correlation in different computational finance applications are considered on a contextual basis, and then RNG recommendations are made based on the needs of computational finance.
  4. M. Mascagni, L.-Y. Hin (2013), "Parallel Pseudo-Random Number Generators: A Derivative Pricing Perspective with the Heston stochastic volatility model," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 19: 77-105.  We use application-based tests designed to mimic real-life MC scenarios in computational finance using the Heston stochastic volatility model, a widely used pricing framework.  We use this to compare the accuracy and precision profiles among four popular libraries of scalable pseudo-random number generators trng, RngSteam, SPRNG, and Random123. All pseudo-random number generators assessed demonstrate similar standard-error of mean profiles.  However, the bias profiles are more varied albeit comparable.
  5. H. Ji, M. Mascagni and Y. Li (2013), "Convergence Analysis of Markov Chain Monte Carlo Linear Solvers using Ulam-von Neumann Algorithm," SIAM Journal on Numerical Analysis, 51(4): 2107-2122.  This paper looks at the Ulam-von Neumann Monte Carlo algorithm for solving linear systems via the Neumann series.  We provide new necessary and sufficient conditions for convergence based on an analysis of the transition probability matrix that defines the underlying Markov chain.  We also demonstrate the theory with small, but illustrative examples.
  6. T. Mackoy, R. C. Harris, J. Johnson, M. Mascagni and M. O. Fenley (2013), "Numerical Optimization of a Walk-on-Spheres Solver for the Linear Poisson-Boltzmann Equation," Communications in Computational Physics, 13: 195-206.  This paper continues the development of a stochastic walk-on-spheres algorithms for solving the linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation (LPBE).  It demonstrates a series of numerical optimizations that collectively make the computational time of these Monte Carlo LPBE solvers competitive with deterministic methods. The optimization techniques used are to ensure that each atom's contribution to the variance of the electrostatic solvation free energy is the same, to optimize the bias-generating parameters in the algorithm, and to use an epsilon-approximate rather than exact nearest-neighbor search when determining the size of the next step in the Brownian motion when outside the molecule.
  7. M. Mascagni and L.-Y. Hin (2012), "Parallel Random Number Generators in Monte Carlo Derivative Pricing: An Application-Based Test," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 18: 161-179.  This paper uses the computation of a European call option, that has a analytic solution, as the basis of testing parallel random numbers generators.  We took parallel generators based on the RngStream, TRNG, and SPRNG and computed the mean and standard error of the price of the option by integrating a stochastic differential equation using the Euler-Maruyama method.  We formed the statistics by combining samples from the same parallel streams and from different parallel streams as a way to gauge intra- and inter-stream correlations.  The SPRNG library produced the best results.
  8. A. Rasulov, G. Raimova and M. Mascagni (2010), "Monte Carlo solution of Cauchy problem for a nonlinear parabolic equation," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 80(6): 1118-1123.  This paper presents a Markov chain-based algorithm for solving the pure initial-value problem for a class of nonlinear parabolic equations.  The nonlinearity is dealt with with a branching Markov chain, and numerical results are presented as further evidence of efficacy.
  9. C.-O. Hwang, M. Mascagni and T. Won (2010), "Monte Carlo Methods for Computing the Capacitance of the Unit Cube: A Review,"  Mathematics and Computers in Simulation80(6): 1103-1109.  This paper reviews Monte Carlo methods for computing the capacitance of the unit cube to high accuracy.  Based on this, the walk-on-planes (WOB) and walk-on-the-boundary (WOB) methods are analyzed for their computational efficiency.  WOB is found to be superior and is subsequently used to provide a more accurate, and confirmatory, numerical result.
  10. J. Tabak, M. Mascagni and R. Bertram (2010), "Mechanism for the Universal Pattern of Activity in Developing Neuronal Networks," Journal of Neurophysiology, 1023: 2208-2221.  This paper looks at general mechanism for activity in purely excitable networks.  The duration of an episode of activity correlates with the length of the silent interval that precedes it, but not with the interval that follows. We use a modeling approach to explain this characteristic but so far unexplained feature of developing networks. We thus developed simple models incorporating excitatory coupling between heterogeneous neurons and activity-dependent synaptic depression. These models robustly generated episodic activity with the correct correlation pattern. The correlation pattern resulted from episodes being triggered at random levels of recovery from depression while they terminated around the same level of depression. To explain this fundamental difference between episode onset and termination, we then used a mean field model, where only average activity and average level of recovery from synaptic depression are considered. In this model, episode onset is highly sensitive to inputs. Thus, noise resulting from random coincidences in the spike times of individual neurons led to the high variability at episode onset and to the observed correlation pattern.
  11. M. Fenley, M. Mascagni, J. McClain, A. Silalahi and N. Simonov (2010), "Using Correlated Monte Carlo Sampling for Efficiently Solving the Linearized Poisson-Boltzmann Equation Over a Broad Range of Salt Concentrations," Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, 6(1): 300-314.  This paper uses the Monte Carlo technique of the authors to simultaneously solve a boundary-value problem system in biochemical electrostatics over a wide range of external solvent ionic concentrations.  This is accomplished by using a single (longest) random walk, and processing it to be appropriate to sample different solvent concentrations.  The correlation allows us to compute differences of computed quantities with high accuracy despite the use of Monte Carlo.
  12. M. Mascagni and H. Yu (2009), "Scrambled Soboĺ Sequences via Permutation," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 15(4): 311-333.  This paper describes a general, bit-wise, scrambling technique that is first applied to the Soboĺ Sequence. Bits from an unscrambled Soboĺ Sequence are scrambled by choosing a random permutation based on the number of bits chosen for scrambling.  The scrambled results are very good, and this technique has been incorporated in to the SPRNG software architecture.
  13. Y.-W. Jung, B. Lu and M. Mascagni (2009), "A Computational Study of Ion Conductance in the KcsA K+ Channel Using a Nernst-Planck Model with Explicit Resident Ions," Journal of Chemical Physics, 131: 215101. This paper studies the potassium conductance of the KcsA channel using the Nernst-Planck equation to model the electrostatic environment inside the ion channel.  The real channel actually has many K + ions transiting simultaneously, and this paper takes that into account as well.
  14. Y. Li, M. Mascagni and A. Gorin (2009), "A Decentralized Parallel Implementation for Parallel Tempering Algorithm,"  Parallel Computing, 35(5): 269-283.  This paper discusses parallel Tempering (PT), also known as Replica Exchange, which is a powerful Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling approach which aims at reducing the relaxation time in simulations of physical systems. In this paper, we present a novel implementation of PT, so-called decentralized replica exchange PT, using MPI and the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators (SPRNG) libraries. By adjusting the replica exchange operations in the original PT algorithm, and taking advantage of the characteristics of pseudorandom number generators, this implementation minimizes the overhead caused by interprocessor communication in replica exchange in PT. This enables one to efficiently apply PT to large-scale massively parallel systems. The efficiency of this implementation has been demonstrated in the context of various benchmark energy functions.
  15. N. Simonov, M. Mascagni and M. O. Fenley (2007), "Monte Carlo Based Linear Poisson-Boltzmann Approach Makes Accurate Salt-Dependent Solvation Free Energy Predictions Possible," Journal of Chemical Physics, 127: 18505.  This paper uses Monte Carlo techniques developed by the authors to make computations of the solvation free energy over a wide range of salt concentrations.  The problems solved involve the implicit solvent model, Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and the results obtained agree with other computational results as well as experimental results.  In addition, these computations explicitly benefit from another advantage of using Monte Carlo in these computations, the ability to use a single simulation to compute the energies at all of the different salt concentrations.
  16. Y. Li and M. Mascagni (2005), "Grid-based Quasi-Monte Carlo Applications," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 11: 39-55.  This paper presents preliminary results on extending the Grid-based Monte Carlo services to quasi-Monte Carlo.  Experiments using scrambled quasirandom numbers are also presented.
  17. H. Chi, M. Mascagni, and T. Warnock (2005), "On the Scrambled Halton Sequence," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 70(1): 9-21.  This paper analyzes the two-dimensional correlations in the Halton sequence, and based on this analysis presents a new way to find an optimal scrambling (derandomization) of the Halton sequence.  The efficacy of this new scrambling is numerically demonstrated to be far superior to the unscrambled Halton sequence on a very difficult high-dimensional integral.  This paper is joint with Tony Warnock, a Halton student.
  18. M. Mascagni and N. A. Simonov (2004), "Monte Carlo Methods for Calculating Some Physical Properties of Large Molecules," SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, 26(1): 339-357.  This paper carefully presents a Monte Carlo algorithm for computing the solution of an internal Poisson and external linearized Poisson-Boltzmann problem for molecular geometries.  An analysis of the Monte Carlo estimators is given, as well as a detailed computational complexity analysis.  Finally, a simple problem involving two spherical molecules is solved with the methods described in the paper.
  19. M. Mascagni and H. Chi (2004), "Parallel Linear Congruential Generators with Sophie-Germain Moduli," Parallel Computing, 30: 1217-1231.  This paper considers the use of Sophie-Germain primes, primes of the form m=2p+1 where p is also prime, for use in parameterized linear congruential generators.  It is shown that this choice minimizes initialization time, maximizes the number of streams for a given prime modulus, and provides fast generation when particular Sophie-Germain moduli are used.
  20. A. Karaivanova, M. Mascagni and N. Simonov (2004), "Parallel Quasirandom Walks on the Boundary," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 10: 311-320.  This paper studies the us of quasirandom numbers in the solution problems using the "random walk on the boundary" Monte Carlo algorithm.  The analysis and numerical results show that a small but significant improvement in convergence rate is seen over traditional Monte Carlo on this algorithm.
  21. M. Mascagni and H. Chi (2004), "On the Scrambled Halton Sequence," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 10: 435-442.  This paper analyzes the two-dimensional correlations in the Halton sequence, and based on this analysis presents a new way to find an optimal scrambling (derandomization) of the Halton sequence.  The efficacy of this new scrambling is numerically demonstrated to be far superior to the unscrambled Halton sequence on a very difficult high-dimensional integral.
  22. Y. Li, M. Mascagni, R. van Engelen and Q. Cai (2004), "A Grid Workflow-Based Monte Carlo Simulation Environment," Neural Parallel and Scientific Computations, 12: 439-454.  This paper takes our previous work on grid services for Monte Carlo and views these services in a workflow setting.
  23. N. A. Simonov and M. Mascagni (2004), "Random Walk Algorithms for Estimating Effective Properties of Digitized Porous Media," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 10: 599-608.  This paper describes a Monte Carlo method for permeability calculations in complex digitized porous structures.  The results of computational experiments for some random models of porous media confirm the log-normality hypothesis for the permeability distribution.
  24. A. Rasulov, A. Karaivanova and M. Mascagni (2004), "Quasirandom in Branching Random Walks," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 10: 551-558.  This paper studies the effects of using quasirandom numbers in the generation of branching walks used to solved certain nonlinear boundary-value problems.  A slight improvement in convergence rate is seen.
  25. M. Mascagni and N. A. Simonov (2004), "The Random Walk on the Boundary Method for Calculating Capacitance," Journal of Computational Physics, 195(2): 465-473. This paper describes the random walk on the boundary Monte Carlo method, and applies it to the calculation of the capacitance of the unit cube. This calculation is the most accurate known.
  26. C.-O. Hwang and M. Mascagni (2004), "Electrical Capacitance of the Unit Cube," Journal of Applied Physics, 95(7): 3798-3802.  This paper presents a new computation of the capacitance of the unit cube using a first-passage variant based on walks on planes.  The computed results are consistent with our previous computations, and has a slightly smaller set of error bars.
  27. M. Mascagni and A. Srinivasan (2004), "Parameterizing Parallel Multiplicative Lagged-Fibonacci Generators," Parallel Computing, 30: 899-916.  This paper shows how to parameterize full-period multiplicative lagged-Fibonacci generators via the seed, and then how to use this to produce a parallel version of the generator.  This generator is now used in the SPRNG library.
  28. C.-O. Hwang and M. Mascagni (2003), "Analysis and Comparison of Green's Function First-Passage Algorithms with "Walk on Spheres" Algorithms," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 63: 605-613.  This paper shows that the Green's function first-passage (GFFP) algorithm is always more efficient that the "walk on spheres" algorithm for solving elliptic PDEs.  In addition, the complexity of GFFP is analyzed.
  29. M. Mascagni and C.-O. Hwang (2003), "e-Shell Error Analysis of Walk on Spheres Algorithms," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 63: 605-613.  This paper provides analytic and empirical evidence that the error associated the the e-shell used in Walk on Spheres algorithms is linear in e.  This result motivates the preferential usage of the Green's function first-passage method over Walk on Spheres when both are applicable.
  30. C.-O. Hwang, M. Mascagni and J. A. Given (2003), "A Feynman-Kac Path-Integral Implementation for Poisson's Equation Using an h-conditioned Green's Function," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 62: 347-355.  This paper presents a new random walk method for solving the Poisson equation using the Feynman-Kac formula using only a small number of points in a Brownian trajectory.
  31. Y. Li and M. Mascagni (2003), "Analysis of Large-scale Grid-based Monte Carlo Applications,"  International Journal of High Performance Computing Applications (IJHPCA), 17(4): 369-382.  This paper provides an overview of the M-out-of-N technique for Grid-based Monte Carlo.  Also, methods for producing trustworthy Monte Carlo computations are presented.
  32. A. Srinivasan, M. Mascagni, and D. Ceperley  (2003), "Testing Parallel Random Number Generators,"  Parallel Computing, 29: 69-94.  This paper provides a mathematical framework for testing parallel random number generators and also motivates the construction of the SPRNG test suite.  In addition, results from extensive parallel testing of multiplicative lagged-Fibonacci generators, candidates for SPRNG, are presented.
  33. J. A. Given, C.-O. Hwang and M. Mascagni (2002), "First- and last-passage Monte Carlo algorithms for the charge density distribution on a conducting surface," Physical Review E, 66, 056704, 8 pages.  This paper presents two new Monte Carlo algorithms based on the concept of "last-passage" diffusion.  These methods are compared with each other and with the best first-passage algorithm for computing the charge density on a circular disk held at unit potential.
  34. C.-O. Hwang, J. A. Given and M. Mascagni (2001), "The Simulation-Tabulation Method for Classical Diffusion Monte Carlo," Journal of Computational Physics, 174: 925-946.  This paper shows how simulated Green's functions, simulation-tabulation, can be used to augment our Green's function first-passage Monte Carlo method.  The utility of simulation-tabulation is verified by solving problems from materials science and biochemistry.
  35. M. Mascagni, A. Karaivanova and Y. Li (2001), "A Quasi-Monte Carlo Method for Elliptic Partial Differential Equations," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 7: 283-294.  This paper presents new bounds on errors associated with the use of quasirandom numbers in Markov chain-based methods for the solution of elliptic partial differential equations.
  36. C.-O. Hwang, M. Mascagni and J. A. Given (2001), "Rapid Diffusion Monte Carlo Algorithms for Fluid Dynamic Permeability," Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 7: 213-222.  This paper uses our Green's function first-passage Monte Carlo method to compute the permeability of a wide class of porous media models considerably extending our previous results. 
  37. C.-O. Hwang and  M. Mascagni (2001), "Efficient Modified Walk on Spheres Algorithm for the Linearized Poisson-Boltzmann Equation," Applied Physics Letters, 76: 787-789.  This paper presents an improved method for using the Feynman-Kac formula as the basis for a Monte Carlo algorithm to solve the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation.  This is accomplished with a new probability that is used to terminate random walks in the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann case.
  38. M. Mascagni and A. Karaivanova (2000), "Matrix Computations Using Quasirandom Sequences,"  Springer Verlag Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 1988: 552-559.  This paper presents new methods and error bounds for using quasi-Monte Carlo methods for computing eigenvalues of large, sparse matrices.
  39. M. Mascagni and A. Srinivasan (2000), "Algorithm 806: SPRNG: A Scalable Library for Pseudorandom Number Generation," ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software, 26: 436-461.  This paper describes the SPRNG library and gives an overview of the mathematical foundation for the random number generators in SPRNG, the computational techniques used in parallelization, the randomness testing suite in SPRNG, and shows how the library can be used to provide reliable and reproducible parallel Monte Carlo computations.  SPRNG is the first library of its kind.
  40. C.-O. Hwang, J. A. Given and M. Mascagni (2000), "On the Rapid Calculation of Permeability for Porous Media Using Brownian Motion Paths," Physics of Fluids, 12: 1699-1709.  This paper derives our Green's function first-passage Monte Carlo method and applies it to the computation of the fluid permeability of porous media made up of overlapping and nonoverlapping monosized spheres.  This new method is the fastest method known for doing these kinds of calculations.
  41. M. Mascagni (1998), "High-Performance Monte Carlo Tools," IEEE Computational Science and Engineering, 5(2): 97-98.  This article summarizes the state-of-the-art for high-performance Monte Carlo tools.
  42. M. Mascagni (1998), "Parallel Linear Congruential Generators with Prime Moduli," Parallel Computing, 24: 923-936.  This paper derives a method for parameterizing primitive roots modulo a prime and uses this as the basis for providing parallel linear congruential random numbers.  In addition, an efficient algorithm for finding the ith integer relatively prime to given, factored, integer is presented.
  43. M. Mascagni, M. L. Robinson, D. V. Pryor and S. A. Cuccaro (1995), "Parallel Pseudorandom Number Generation Using Additive Lagged-Fibonacci Recursions", Springer Verlag Lecture Notes in Statistics, 106: 263-277.  This paper proves bounds on exponential sum bounds used to estimate the cross-correlation between different random number streams produced using our parallelization of additive lagged-Fibonacci generators.
  44. M. Mascagni, S. A. Cuccaro, D. V. Pryor and M. L. Robinson (1995), "A Fast, High Quality, and Reproducible Parallel Lagged-Fibonacci Pseudorandom Number Generator", Journal of Computational Physics, 119: 211-219.  This paper presents a novel parameterization of additive lagged-Fibonacci generators based on seeding.  This approach is used as the basis of providing a parallel version of this generator that requires no interprocessor communication while assuring that different processors get distinct random number streams.
  45. A. Sherman and M. Mascagni (1994), "A Gradient Random Walk Method for Two-Dimensional Reaction-Diffusion Equations'', SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, 15: 1280-1293.  This paper presents and analyzes a Monte Carlo method for solving two-dimensional reaction-diffusion equations.  The method is related to the random vortex method for the two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, and the paper also presents numerical evidence of it's effectiveness.
  46. M. Mascagni (1991), "A Parallelizing Algorithm for Computing Solutions to Arbitrarily Branched Neuron Models," Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 36: 105-114.  This paper presents a parallel algorithm for solving coupled, branching, one-dimensional nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations based on finite-difference methods.  These kinds of equations arise in the realistic modeling of the nervous system.
  47. M. Mascagni (1991), "High-Dimensional Numerical Integration and Massively Parallel Computing," Contemporary Mathematics, 115: 53-73.  This paper presents parallel data-parallel methods for doing deterministic and Monte Carlo high-dimensional numerical integration using parallel prefix methods.  In addition, data-parallel techniques for Monte Carlo solution of partial differential equations based on random walks is presented along with numerical examples performed on the CM-2 massively parallel computer.
  48. M. Mascagni (1990), "The Backward Euler Method for Numerical Solution of the Hodgkin-Huxley Equations of Nerve Conduction," SIAM Journal on Numerical Analysis, 27: 941-962.  This method analyzed the convergence of the backward Euler method for the finite-difference solution of the Neumann initial-boundary value problem for the Hodgkin-Huxley equations of nerve conduction.  Convergence is proved with the help of derived a priori bounds for solutions to the nonlinear difference equations.
  49. M. Mascagni (1990), "In Initial-Boundary Value Problem of Physiological Importance for Equations of Nerve Conduction," Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics, 42: 213-227.  The paper proves well-posedness in the sense of Hadamard for the Neumann initial-boundary value problem for the Hodgkin-Huxley equations of nerve conduction.  In addition, a priori bounds on the solution of this nonlinear system of partial differential equations.
  50. M. Mascagni (1989), "Animation's Role in Mathematically Modeling the Nervous System," Iris Universe, Winter 1989: 6-18.  This paper presents computational results obtained in the numerical modeling of a ring of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with passive dendritic segments.  In particular, a presentation level visualization of the results is presented as well as a discussion of new visualization tools that allow rapid qualitative analysis of the large data sets produced in realistic neural modeling.
  51. M. Mascagni and W. L. Miranker (1985), "Arithmetically Improved Algorithmic Performance," Computing, 35: 153-175.  This paper presents theoretical and numerical evidence that numerical algorithms sensitive to numerical accuracy can be significantly improved by using augmented floating-point arithmetic to exactly compute inner products.  This augmented arithmetic was implemented in hardware in IBM 370 series mainframe with the ACRITH product.
  52. W. L. Miranker, M. Mascagni, and S. Rump (1985), "Case Studies for Augmented Floating-Point Arithmetic," Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 235: 86-118.  This paper provides numerical examples from poorly posed problems arising from finite-difference solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations, and numerical linear algebra to  motivate the use of augmented floating-point arithmetic to exactly compute inner products.

Invited International Publications:

  1. M. Mascagni (1999), "Parallel Pseudorandom Number Generation," SIAM News, August, pp. 1,8-10.  This article provides a general presentation of the mathematical and computational underpinnings of parallel random number generation.  In particular, the problem of parallel reproducibility and the solution of parameterized random number generations id discussed.
  2. M. Mascagni (1990), "Parallel Wiener Integral Methods for Elliptic Boundary Value Problems: A Tale of Two Architectures," SIAM News, July, pp. 27-33.  This article looks at SIMD and MIMD implementations of random walk based Monte Carlo algorithms for the solution of elliptic boundary value problems.  It was reprinted as item 6 among the refereed book chapters, above.

Refereed International Conference Papers:

  1. D. Juba, W. Keyrouz, M. Mascagni, M. Brady (2016), "Acceleration and Parallelization of ZENO/Walk-on-Spheres," Procedia Computer Science, 80: 269-278.  This was an accepted paper in the  International Conference on Computational Science 2016 (ICCS 2016).  In this paper we outline the single node optimization of the computational geometry primitives needed in a walk on spheres solver called ZENO from NIST.  We also investigate the parallelization of this Monte Carlo algorithm.  The overall improvement in single node performance over the original code is over a factor of 1000, and we also show good weak and strong scalability.
  2. Z. Xu, W. Yu, C. Zhang, B. Zhang, M. Lu, M. Mascagni (2016), "A Parallel Random Walk Solver for the Capacitance Calculation Problem in Touchscreen Design," Great Lakes Symposium on VLSI 2016, Boston, MA, in the press, 6 pages.  In this paper we present a random walk based solver which calculates the capacitances for verifying touchscreen design. To suit the complicated conductor geometries in touchscreen structures, we extend the floating random walk (FRW) method for handling non-Manhattan conductors.  The parallel algorithm is implemented on a computer cluster, and numerical experiments validate the accuracy of proposed techniques and demonstrate a 67X parallel speedup.
  3. M. Mascagni and J. Ren (2008), "New Development in the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generator (SPRNG) Library," The Institute of Statistical Mathematics Cooperative Research Report, 210: 120-125.  The Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators (SPRNG) Library is a widely used software package for random number generation in high-performance computing settings.  In this paper, we provide an overview of SPRNG and especially discuss its recent developments. First, we give a very short review of random number generators and their applications to Monte Carlo computations. Then, we discuss some methods of parallel random number generation, and give the rationale for SPRNG. We next discuss about the past versions of SPRNG and the most recent version, version 4.0. Finally, webriefly discuss the impact of SPRNG and speculate on possible future work to SPRNG.
  4. M. Mascagni (2008), "Random Number Generation : A Practitioner's Overview," The Institute of Statistical Mathematics Cooperative Research Report, 210: 97-119.  This gives a comprehensive overview of pseudorandom number generation, parallel pseudorandom number generation, and quasirandom number generation.  The presentation is motivated by an applications-based point-of-view.
  5. Y. Li, M. Mascagni and A. Gorin (2007), "Decentralized Replica Exchange Parallel Tempering: An Efficient Implementation of Parallel Tempering Using MPI and SPRNG," Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 4707: 507-519.  This was a paper given at the international conference entitled Computational Science and Its Applications (ICCSA 2007) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in August, 2007.  This paper discusses parallel Tempering (PT), also known as Replica Exchange, which is a powerful Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling approach which aims at reducing the relaxation time in simulations of physical systems. In this paper, we present a novel implementation of PT, so-called decentralized replica exchange PT, using MPI and the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators (SPRNG) libraries. By adjusting the replica exchange operations in the original PT algorithm, and taking advantage of the characteristics of pseudorandom number generators, this implementation minimizes the overhead caused by interprocessor communication in replica exchange in PT. This enables one to efficiently apply PT to large-scale massively parallel systems. The efficiency of this implementation has been demonstrated in the context of various benchmark energy functions, such as the high-dimensional Rosenbrock function, and a rugged funnel-like function.
  6. H. Chi and M. Mascagni (2007), "Efficient Generation of Parallel Quasirandom Sequences via Scrambling," Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 4487: 723-730.  This was a paper given at the international conference entitled International Conference on Computational Science 2007 (ICCS 2007), held May 2007 in Beijing, People's Republic of China.  This paper proposes an alternative approach for generating parallel quasirandom sequences. We take a single quasirandom sequence and provide different random digit scramblings of the given sequence. The exact meaning of the digit scrambling we use depends on the mathematical details of the quasirandom number sequence's method of generation. For the Faure sequence we scramble by modifying the generator matrices in the definition. The obtained sequences are very interesting as the scrambled versions used in individual processes are of higher quality than the original Faure sequence. Thus, we not only obtain the expected near-perfect speedup of the naturally parallel Monte Carlo methods, but the errors in the parallel computation is even smaller than if the computation were done with the same quantity of quasirandom numbers using the original, unscrambled, Faure sequence.
  7. N. A. Simonov and M. Mascagni (2005), "The Method of Random Walk on Sphere for Solving Boundary-Value problems for Molecular Electrostatics, Proceedings of the 17th IMACS World Congress, 5 pages published on compact disc, July, 2005.  This paper presents preliminary results for a new method for evaluating internal boundary conditions that arise in molecular electrostatics computations.  The methods were developed to work in concert with existing Monte Carlo methods for solving the entire PDE system, and are a significant improvement on a finite-difference based method previously developed.  Not only is performance enhanced by an order of magnitude, but a bias from the finite-difference based method is eliminated. 
  8. Y. Li and M. Mascagni (2005), "A Bio-inspired Job Scheduling Algorithm for Monte Carlo Applications on a Computational Grid," Proceedings of the 17th IMACS World Congress, 7 pages published on compact disc, July, 2005.  In this paper we present a bio-inspired job scheduling mechanism that enables the adaptation of large-scale, naturally parallel and compute-intensive Monte Carlo tasks to clustered computational farms, such as large-scale computational grids, with heterogeneous and dynamic performance.  The kernel of this scheduling mechanism is a swarm intelligent algorithm, which is inspired from the ants’ behavior in a social insect colony.
  9. C. Fleming, M. Mascagni and N. A. Simonov (2005), "An Efficient Monte Carlo Approach for Solving Linear Problems in Biomolecular Electrostatics," Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS 2005), V. S. Sunderam, G. D. van Albada, P. M. A. Sloot, and  J. J. Dongarra (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 3516: 760-765 (Part 3). (May 2005, Atlanta, GA)  This paper presents preliminary results for a new method for evaluating internal boundary conditions that arise in molecular electrostatics computations.  The methods were developed to work in concert with existing Monte Carlo methods for solving the entire PDE system, and are a significant improvement on a finite-difference based method previously developed.  Not only is performance enhanced by an order of magnitude, but a bias from the finite-difference based method is eliminated.
  10. H. Chi, P. Beerli, D. W. Evans and M. Mascagni (2005), "On the Scrambled Soboĺ Sequence," Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS 2005), V. S. Sunderam, G. D. van Albada, P. M. A. Sloot, and  J. J. Dongarra (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 3516: 775-782 (Part 3). (May 2005, Atlanta, GA  This paper presents an optimal linear scrambling of the Soboĺ sequence with techniques similar to those previously developed by Chi and Mascagni for the Faure and Halton sequences.  This sequences is shown to be of good quality in comparison to others based on the evaluation of a high-dimensional geometrical Asian option.
  11. N. A. Simonov and M. Mascagni (2004), "Random Walk Algorithms for Estimating Electrostatic Properties of Large Molecules," Proceedings of The International Conference on Computational Mathematics (ICCM-2004), Novosibirsk, Russia, G. A. Mikhailov, V. P. Il'in, and Y. M. Laevsky, eds., ICM&G Publisher, Novosibirsk, Russia, Part I: 352-358.  This paper describes a new Monte Carlo algorithm for solving the coupled Poisson/Poisson-Boltzmann system related to the electrostatics of large molecules in a continuum model of solvent.
  12. M. Mascagni, A. Karaivanova, C.-O. Hwang (2004), "Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods for Elliptic  Boundary Value Problems," Proceedings of Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing (MCQMC) 2002, H. Niederreiter (ed.), Springer Verlag: Berlin, pp. 345-356.  This paper gives a brief overview of quasi-Monte Carlo methods for solving elliptic boundary value problems using walk-on-spheres variants.
  13. Y. Li and M. Mascagni (2004), "E-Science Workflow on the Grid," Proceedings of the International Association for the Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference: e-Society 2004, P. Isaías, P. Komers, M. McPherson (eds.),  pp. 1041-1046.  This paper describes how one can use workflow techniques to implement e-science-based grid computations.  Specifically, it describes how one maps agent operations from workflow onto grid services using XML as the communications intermediary.
  14. Y. Li and M. Mascagni (2004), "E-Science on the Grid: Toward a Dynamic E-Science Automation with XML and Workflow Techniques," accepted to the Proceedings of the 8th World Multiconference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics (SCI 2004), Orlando, Florida, 7 pages.  This paper describes how one can use workflow techniques to implement e-science-based grid computations.  Specifically, it describes how one maps agent operations from workflow onto grid services using XML as the communications intermediary.
  15. M. Mascagni and H. Chi (2004), "Optimal Quasi-Monte Carlo Valuation of Derivative Securities," Computational Finance and Its Applications, M. Costantino and C. A. Brebbia (eds.), WIT Press, pp. 177-185.  This paper finds an optimal scrambling of the Faure sequence within the i-binomial family.  Then, this derandomized generalized Faure (GFaure) sequence is used to evaluate a high-dimensional derivative security, an European call option on the geometric mean of several assets.  The numerical results show improvement over the plain Faure sequence.
  16. M. Mascagni and Y. Li (2004), "Computational Infrastructure for Parallel, Distributed, and Grid-based Monte Carlo Computations," Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Large-Scale Scientific Computations (LSSC'03), Sozopol, Bulgaria, I. Lirkov, S. Margenov, J. Wasniewski, P. Yalamov eds., Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences, 2907: 39-52.  This paper provides an overview of computational infrastructure for parallel, distributed, and Grid-based Monte Carlo computations.  The starting point is the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators (SPRNG) Library, and its uses for parallel and distributed Monte Carlo, and the discussion ends with a description of our Grid-Computing Infrastructure for Monte Carlo Applications (GCIMCA).
  17. A. Karaivanova, M. Mascagni and N. Simonov (2004), "Solving Boundary Value Problems Using Quasirandom Walks on the Boundary," Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Large-Scale Scientific Computations (LSSC'03), Sozopol, Bulgaria, I. Lirkov, S. Margenov, J. Wasniewski, P. Yalamov eds., Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences, 2907: 162-169.  This paper studies the us of quasirandom numbers in the solution problems using the "random walk on the boundary" Monte Carlo algorithm.  The analysis and numerical results show that a small but significant improvement in convergence rate is seen over traditional Monte Carlo on this algorithm.
  18. A. Karaivanova and M. Mascagni (2003), "Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods for Some Problems in Linear Algebra," Proceedings of the 7th Joint Conference on Information Sciences (JCIS 2003), pp. 1754-1757.  This paper presents Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo methods for the solution of various problems in numerical linear algebra.  The paper begins with an analysis of matrix-vector products, then solutions via Neumann series, and finally the eigenvalue problems including stochastic versions of the power method and the resolvent method.
  19. M. Mascagni and A. Karaivanova (2002), "A Monte Carlo Approach for Finding More Than One Eigenpair," Proceedings of Fifth International Conference on Numerical Methods and Applications, I. Dimov, L. Lirkov, S. Margenov, and Z. Zlatev (eds.),  Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2542: 123-131.  This paper extends previous results on Monte Carlo methods for spectral linear algebra calculations.
  20. Y. Li, M. Mascagni and R. van Engelen (2003), "GCIMCA: A Globus and SPRNG Implementation of a Grid-Computing Infrastructure for Monte Carlo Applications," accepted to the The 2003 International Conference on Parallel and Distributed Processing Techniques and Applications, (PDPTA'03), Las Vegas, Nevada,  5 pages.  Taking advantage of the grid facilities of the Globus toolkit and the large-scale random number streams generated by the SPRNG library, this paper discusses the implementation of GCIMCA, the Grid-Computing Infrastructure for Monte Carlo Applications, to provide services for high-performance and trustworthy grid-based Monte Carlo computations.
  21. M. Mascagni and N. A. Simonov (2003), "Monte Carlo Methods for Calculating the Electrostatic Energy of a Molecule," Proceedings of the 2003 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS 2003), P. M. A. Sloot, D. Abramson, A. V. Bogdanov, J. J. Dongarra, A. Y. Zomaya, and Y. E. Gorbachev (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2330: 598-608 (Part 2). (June 2003, Melbourne, Australia and Saint Petersburg, Russia)  This paper presents a new Monte Carlo algorithm for computing an electrostatic form of the internal energy of a large protein molecule.  The algorithm is also analyzed.
  22. Y. Li and M. Mascagni (2003), "Improving Performance via Computational Replication on a Large-Scale Computational Grid," Proceedings of the IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Cluster Computing and the Grid (IEEE/ACM CCGRID2003), pp. 442-448.  This paper describes and analyze the computational replication method to improve performance of a generic application on a computational grid.  The computational replication method is extended to an N-out-of-M schedule technique to improve the wall clock time of Grid-based Monte Carlo computations.
  23. Y. Li, M. Mascagni and M. H. Peters (2003), "Grid-based Nonequilibrium Multiple-Time Scale Molecular Dynamics/Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Ligand-Receptor Interactions in Structured Protein Systems," Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Biomedical Computations on the Grid (BioGrid'03) in Proceedings of the IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Cluster Computing and the Grid (IEEE/ACM CCGRID2003), pp. 568-573.  This paper describes the application of our Grid-based Monte Carlo technology to problems in protein biophysics.
  24. M. Mascagni and N. A. Simonov (2002), "Random Walk Algorithms on The Boundary Methods for Computing Reaction Rate and Capacitance," Proceedings of the The International Conference on Computational Mathematics, G. A. Mikhailov, V. P. Il'in, Y. M. Laevsky (eds.), ICM & MG Publishers, Novosibirsk, Russia, pp. 238-242.  This paper presents "walk on the boundary" methods for solving some boundary-value problems formulated as integral equations.  Specifically, it deals with computing the capacitance of a convex object and diffusion-limited reaction rates.
  25. Y. Li and M. Mascagni (2002), "Grid-based Monte Carlo Application," Proceedings of Grid Computing-GRID 2002, Manish Parashar (ed.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2536: 13-24.  This paper examines the suitability of Monte Carlo applications for the grid.  In addition, the M-out-of-N strategy is examined to speed Grid Monte Carlo computations in a faulty environment and in using the random number generator to provide the ability to validate a volunteered Monte Carlo computation.
  26. M. Mascagni and A. Karaivanova (2002), "A Parallel Quasi-Monte Carlo Method for Solving Systems of Linear Equations,"  Proceedings of the 2002 International Conference on Computational Science, Peter M. A. Sloot, C. J. Kenneth Tan, Jack J. Dongarra, Alfons G. Hoekstra (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2330: 598-608 (Part 2).  (April 2002, Amsterdam, Netherlands)  This paper presents and analyzes a quasi-Monte Carlo approach to solving systems of linear systems.  In addition, the parallel efficiency of this method is shown to be extremely good and consistent with the ordinary Monte Carlo approach to this problem.
  27. A. Srinivasan and M. Mascagni (2002), "Monte Carlo Techniques for Estimating the Fiedler Vector in Graph Applications," Proceedings of the 2002 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS 2002), Peter M.A. Sloot, C. J. Kenneth Tan, Jack J. Dongarra, Alfons G. Hoekstra (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2330: 635-645 (Part 2).   (April 2002, Amsterdam, Netherlands)  This paper shows how to use Monte Carlo techniques, based on Markov chains and the probabilistic computations of matrix-vector products, to estimate the Fiedler vector.  This problem has significance in graph partitioning problems related to domain decomposition.
  28. M. Mascagni and A. Karaivanova (2001), "A Parallel Quasi-Monte Carlo Method for Computing Extremal Eigenvalues," Proceedings of Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods 2000, K.-T. Fang, H. F. J. Hickernell, and H. Niederreiter, eds., Springer-Verlag: Berlin: pp. 369-380.  (December 2000, Honk Kong, China)  This paper provides an error bound for the use of quasi-Monte Carlo methods for computing extremal eigenvalues of sparse matrices via methods related to the power method.  In addition, it is shown that the parallel efficiency expected of Monte Carlo methods extends to these Markov chain-based quasi-Monte Carlo methods.
  29. J. A. Given, M. Mascagni, and C.-O. Hwang (2001), "Continuous Path Brownian Trajectories for Diffusion Monte Carlo Via First- and Last-Passage Distributions," Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Large-Scale Scientific Computations,  S. Margenov, J. Wazniewski and P. Yalamov (eds.),  Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2179: 46-57. (June 2001, Sozopol, Bulgaria)  This paper presents an overview of the application of the Green's function first-passage and simulation tabulation methods to problems arising in porous media, composite materials, and biochemistry.
  30. C.-O. Hwang, J. A. Given, and M. Mascagni (2001), "A Feynman-Kac Path-Integral Implementation for Poisson's Equation," in the Proceedings of the 2001 International Conference on Computational Science, part I, pp. 1282-1288. (May 2001, San Francisco, CA)  This paper presents a new method to evaluate path integrals arising from the Feynman-Kac solution of the Poisson equation when only first-passage information is known about the path trajectories.  This has applications for the use of the Green's function first-passage method for Poisson's equation.
  31. M. Mascagni (2000), "Theory and Software for Parallel Random Number Generation," Proceedings of The Fourth International Conference on Supercomputing in Nuclear Applications (SNA 2000), CD-ROM: 14 pages. (September 2000, Tokyo, Japan). This paper presents an overview of parallel random number generation aimed at the Nuclear Engineering community.  Mathematical background and the use of SPRNG is presented.
  32. M. Zhou and M. Mascagni (2000), "The Cycle Server: A Web Platform for Running Parallel Monte Carlo Applications on a Heterogeneous Condor Pool of Workstations," Proceedings of the 2000 International Conference on Parallel Processing Workshops on Scalable Web Services, pp. 111-118. (August 2000, Toronto, Canada)  This paper presents a distributed computing tool that permits users to submit and retrieve parallel Monte Carlo jobs to a Condor cluster.  Most importantly, this tool provides a distributed compilation service that, given application source, produces executables for many different operating system/architecture combinations.
  33. M. Mascagni and S. Rahimi (2000), "Parallel Inversive Congruential Generators:  Software and Field-Programmable Gate Array Implementations," in Proceedings of the International Conference on Monte Carlo Simulation, G. I. Schuëller and P. D. Spanos, eds., pp. 35-40. (June 2000, Monte Carlo, Monaco)  This paper presents a hardware design for modular integer inversion and implements and benchmarks the design on a field-programmable gate array device.  This problem is motivated by the desire to accelerate the generation of inversive congruential pseudorandom numbers.
  34. A. Karaivanova and M. Mascagni (2000), "Are Quasirandom Numbers Good for Anything Besides Integration?"  Proceedings of Advances in Reactor Physics and Mathematics and Computation into the Next Millennium (PHYSOR2000),  CD-ROM: 15 pages. (May 2000, Pittsburgh, PA)  This paper presents quasi-Monte Carlo methods for Markov-chain based problems arising from numerical linear algebra.  It contrasts these applications of quasirandom numbers to the more classical application of numerical integration.
  35. M. Mascagni (1999), "SPRNG: A Scalable Library for Pseudorandom Number Generation,"  in Proceedings of the Ninth SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, CD-ROM: 10 pages.  (March 1999, San Antonio, TX)  This paper presents an overview of parallel pseudorandom number generation via parameterization and discuss particulars of the SPRNG library.
  36. M. Hydari, D. M. Ceperley, A. Srinivasan, and M. Mascagni (1999), "A Fast High-Quality Pseudo Random Number Library for Java," in Proceedings of the Ninth SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, CD-ROM: 17 pages. (March 1999, San Antonio, TX)  This paper presents a Java extension to the SPRNG library.
  37. M. Mascagni (1999), "SPRNG: A Scalable Library for Pseudorandom Number Generation," Recent Advances in Numerical Methods and Applications II,  O. Iliev, B. Sendov, M. Kaschiev, S. Margenov, P. Vassilevski, editors, World Scientific, pp. 284-295. (August 1998, Sofia, Bulgaria)  This paper presents an overview of parallel pseudorandom number generation via parameterization and discuss particulars of the SPRNG library.
  38. J.-L. Larriba-Pey, M. Mascagni, A. Jorba and J. J. Navarro (1995), "An Analysis of the Parallel Computation of Arbitrarily Branched Cable Neuron Models'', in Proceedings of the Seventh SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, pp. 373-378. (March 1995, San Francisco, CA)  This paper provides an analysis of parallel finite-difference methods for solving nerve equations based on new results for parallel tridiagonal linear system solvers.
  39. S. A. Cuccaro, M. Mascagni and D. V. Pryor (1995) "Techniques for Testing the Quality of Parallel Pseudorandom Number Generators'', Proceedings of the Seventh SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, pp. 279-284. (March 1995, San Francisco, CA)  This paper presents a mathematical framework for the testing of parallel random number generators based on the parallel modification of serials tests and on the use of exponential sum tests.
  40. D. V. Pryor, S. A. Cuccaro, M. Mascagni and M. L. Robinson (1994) "Implementation and Usage of a Portable and Reproducible Parallel Pseudorandom Number Generator'', Proceedings of Supercomputing '94, pp. 311-319. (November 1994, Washington, D.C.)  This paper discusses the parallel computational aspects that permit the dynamic spawning of distinct parallel random number generators without the need for interprocessor communication.  The method utilizes parameterized generators mapped to the binary tree and the manipulations that are simplified with this mapping.
  41. M. Mascagni, S. A. Cuccaro, D. V. Pryor and M. L. Robinson (1993) "Recent Developments in Parallel Pseudorandom Number Generation'', Proceedings of the Sixth SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, pp. 524-529. (March 1993, Norfolk, VA)  This paper presents results on the parameterization of additive lagged-Fibonacci generators for use in parallel.

International Conference Proceedings Edited:

  1. M. Mascagni, guest editor (2010), Conference Proceedings of the Fifth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods published as volume 80, number 6 of Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Boston, London, New York, Oxford, Paris, Philadelphia, San Diego, St. Louis.
  2. D. H. Bailey, P. E. Bjørstad, J. R. Gilbert, M. V. Mascagni, R. S. Schreiber, H. D. Simon, V. J. Torczon and L. T. Watson, editors (1995) Proceedings of the Seventh SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, SIAM, Philadelphia.

National Conference Papers:

  1. M. Zhou and M. Mascagni (1999), "Parallel Monte Carlo in a Distributed Environment: SPRNG and CONDOR," in Proceedings of the First Southern Symposium on Computing, CD-ROM: 5 pages. (December, 1998, Hattiesburg, MS)  This paper briefly reviews a distributed computing tool that permits users to submit and retrieve parallel Monte Carlo jobs to a Condor cluster.  Most importantly, this tool provides a distributed compilation service that, given application source, produces executables for many different operating system/architecture combinations.
  2. C.-O. Hwang, J. A. Given and M. Mascagni (1999), "A New Fluid Permeability Estimation,"  in Proceedings of the First Southern Symposium on Computing, CD-ROM: 7 pages. (December, 1998, Hattiesburg, MS)  This paper briefly presents Green's function first-passage Monte Carlo method to compute the permeability of porous media models and provides preliminary numerical results.  

Preprints:
  1. C. Ogden and M. Mascagni (2017), “The Impact of Soft Error Event Topography on the Reliability of Computer Memories,” submitted to IEEE Transaction on Reliability, 11 pages.  This paper presents a statistical model of for soft errors in 45nm static RAM.  The model is analyzed statistically, and the simulations show how different mitigation strategies impact the simulated frequency of soft memory errors.
  2. H. Ji, M. Mascagni and Y. Li (2015), "Gaussian Variant of Freivalds' Algorithm for Efficient and Reliable Matrix Product Verification," submitted to the SIAM Journal on Matrix Analysis and Applications (SIMAX), 13 pages.  This paper proposes a stochastic variant of Frievalds' algorithm for detecting faults in matrix-matrix multiplications, and analyzes this method.  The new method is more accurate, essentially never giving false positives, and is a tool for enabling fault-tolerant numerical linear algebra and providing many algorithms resilience, especially to soft faults.

Reports:

  1. M. H. Zhou, M. Mascagni, and A. Y. Qiao (1998), "Explicit Finite Difference Schemes for the Advection Equation," Conservation Law Preprint 1998-024.  This report presents a new explicit finite-difference method for solving the advection equation.
  2. M. Mascagni (1997), "Polynomial versus Matrix Methods for Leap-Ahead in Shift Register Type Pseudorandom Number Generators," Institute for Mathematics and its Applications (IMA) Reprint 1469.  This paper shows that fast leap-ahead methods applicable to shift-register pseudorandom number generators can be extended to additive lagged-Fibonacci generators.
  3. M. Mascagni (1995), "A Deterministic Particle Method for One-Dimensional Reaction-Diffusion Equations'', Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) Technical Report: 95.23, Institute for Defense Analyses Center for Computing Sciences (IDA/CCS) Technical Report: CCS-TR-95-144.  This paper derives a one-dimensional particle method for the solution of nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations.  This method is a level-set analog of Monte Carlo methods previously studied by the author.  Numerical evidence is presented on the efficacy of the method, and error analysis and proof is provided.
  4. M. Mascagni and S. A. Cuccaro (1992), "A Comparison of Modular Multiplication Across Parallel Supercomputing Architectures," Institute for Defense Analyses Supercomputing Research Center Technical Report: SRC-TR-92-116.  This paper compares the speed of integer modular multiplication modulo a Mersenne prime across supercomputing and special purpose computing systems.  This paper was classified after initial publication, and is no longer publicly available.

Abstracts:

  1. J. Tabak, M. Mascagni and R. Bertram (2007), "Spontaneous Episodic Activity: Why Episode Duration is Correlated with the Length of the Preceding but not Following Interval," Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 33: 925.7.  This abstract presents results on using a simple stochastic model to replace a homogeneous integrate-and-fire network of excitatory neurons.  The results are based on correlation between of episode duration with the previous but not the following inter-episode interval.  The leads to a diagnostic for synaptic depression versus cellular adaptation.
  2. M. Mascagni (1987), "Computer Simulation of Negative Feedback in Neurons," Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 13: 375.4.  This abstract presents results on the use of a Hodgkin-Huxley axon/dendrite model to study the effect of negative feedback on repetitive firing behavior of neurons.  It is empirically shown that negative feedback increases the input sensitivity of the repetitive firing response.

Software:

  1. M. Mascagni, A. Srinivasan, D. M. Ceperley, and F. Saied (1995), "Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators (SPRNG) Library."  This package has become the standard for parallel and distributed random number generation and was originally developed under DARPA Contract Number DABT63-95-C-0123 for ITO: Scalable Systems and Software, entitled A Scalable Pseudorandom Number Generation Library for Parallel Monte Carlo Computations at the University of Illinois at Champaign Urbana's National Center for Supercomputing Applications, the Institute for Defense Analyses' Center for Computing Sciences, and the University of Southern Mississippi's Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing.  This software continues to be supported by FSU and the U.S. Department of Energy, and is now distributed at the website: http://www.sprng.org.

Invited Colloquia, Lectures, Proseminars and Seminars:

  1. Tsinghua University, Department of Computer Science and Technology, Beijing, People's Republic of China: Laboratory Seminar, 2015
  2. Beijing Computational Science Research Center (CSRC), Beijing, People's Republic of China, Director's Seminar, 2015
  3. Supercomputing Center of the Computer Network Information Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China, Director's Seminar, 2015
  4. Institute of Computational Mathematics and Scientific/Engineering Computing, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China, 2015
  5. Tsinghua University, Department of Computer Science and Technology, Electronic Design Automation Laboratory, Beijing, People's Republic of China: Laboratory Seminar, 2015
  6. Texas Agricultural and Mechanical (Texas A&M) University, Department of Computer Science, College Station, TX: Seminar, 2015
  7. Texas Agricultural and Mechanical (Texas A&M) University. Department of Mathematics, College Station, TX: Seminar, 2015
  8. D. E. Shaw Research, New York, NY: New York, NY: Invited Lecture, 2015
  9. The Simons Foundation, Simons Center for Data Analysis, New York, NY: Seminar, 2015
  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ: Joint Theory and Computational Plasma Physics Seminar, 2015
  11. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Information Technology Laboratory/Mathematics and Computational Science Division, Gaithersburg, MD: Seminar, 2015
  12. National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Biological Modeling, National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD: Seminar, 2014
  13. Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Information and Communication Technologies, Sofia, Bulgaria, Grid Technologies and Applications Department Seminar, 2015
  14. The Johns Hopkins University, Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Baltimore, MD: Applied Mathematics and Statistics Colloquium, 2015
  15. New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York, NY: Biomathematics and Computational Biology Colloquium, 2015
  16. George Mason University, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Fairfax, VA: Applied and Computational Mathematics Seminar, 2015
  17. University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Ann Arbor, MI: Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences Colloquium, 2015
  18. University of Michigan, Department of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI: Center for the Study of Complex Systems  Colloquium, 2015
  19. Nanyang Technological University, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Division of Mathematical Sciences, Singapore: Seminar of Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computing, 2015
  20. University of Maryland, Department of Computer Science, College Park, MD: Numerical Analysis Seminar, 2015
  21. Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Departement Informatik, Zürich, Switzerland: Self-Organized Seminar (SOS), 2014
  22. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge, TN: Discrete Computing Systems Seminar, 2014
  23. Tulane University, Department of Mathematics, New Orleans, LA: Applied Mathematics Seminar, 2014
  24. The Georgia Institute of Technology, College of Computing, Scholl of Computational Science and Engineering, Atlanta, GA: Computational Science and Engineering Colloquium, 2014
  25. Loyola University Maryland, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Baltimore, MD: Mathematics and Statistics Seminar, 2014
  26. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Cambridge, MA: American Nuclear Society Seminar, 2014
  27. University of Maryland Baltimore County, Department of Mathematics, Baltimore, MD: Applied Mathematics Colloquium, 2014
  28. George Mason University, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Fairfax, VA: Mathematical Sciences Colloquium, 2014
  29. Università degli Studi di Bologna, Bologna, Italy: Seminario di Matematica Applicata, 2014
  30. U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Information Technology Division, Center for Computational Science, Washington, DC: High-Performance Computing Seminar, 2014
  31. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Information Technology Laboratory/Mathematics and Computational Science Division, Gaithersburg, MD: Seminar, 2014
  32. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Materials Measurement Laboratory/Materials Science and Engineering Division, Gaithersburg, MD: Seminar, 2014
  33. Center for Computing Sciences, Institute for Defense Analyses, Bowie, MD: Center for Computing Sciences Seminar, 2014
  34. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA: Exascale Co-design Center for Materials in Extreme Environments (ExMatEx) Seminar, 2014
  35. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA: Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) Colloquium, 2014
  36. Google Incorporated, Googleplex, Mountain View, CA: Google Invited Talk, 2014
  37. Hewlett Packard Laboratories, Exascale Computing Lab, Palo Alto, CA: Exascale Computing Lab Seminar, 2014
  38. Stanford University, Institute for Computational Mathematics and Engineering, Palo Alto, CA: Institute for Computational Mathematics and Engineering Colloquium, 2014
  39. Purdue University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, West Lafayette, IN: Computational Science and Engineering Seminar, 2014
  40. Louisiana State University, Louisiana Alliance for Simulation-Guided Materials Applications (LA-SiGMA), Baton Rouge, LA: LA-SiGMA Seminar, 2014
  41. Louisiana State University, Department of Mathematics, Baton Rouge, LA: Applied Mathematics Seminar, 2014
  42. Sandia National Laboratory, Computer Science Research Institute, Computer Science Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM: Computational Science Seminar, 2013
  43. Institut Supérieur d'Informatique, de Modélisation et de leurs Applications (ISIMA), Advanced Institute for Computer Science, Modeling and Applications, Clermont-Ferrand, France: Computer Science Seminar, 2013
  44. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Information Technology Laboratory/Mathematics and Computational Science Division, Gaithersburg, MD: Seminar, 2013
  45. National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Biological Modeling, National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD: Seminar, 2013
  46. Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique (INRIA), Sophia-Antipolis, France: Tosca Project Seminar, 2013
  47. Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria: Institute for Information and Communication Technologies Colloquium, 2013
  48. Tsinghua University, Department of Computer Science and Technology, Electronic Design Automation Laboratory, Beijing, People's Republic of China: Laboratory Seminar, 2013
  49. University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Department of Mathematics, Charlotte, NC: Applied and Computational Mathematics Seminar, 2013
  50. The National Institute of Informatics (NII), National Research Grid Initiative (NAEGRI), Center for Grid Research and Development, Tokyo, Japan: Institute Seminar, 2013
  51. Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Department of Mathematics, Univerisity of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan: Frontiers in Mathematical Scieneces and Physics Seminar, 2013
  52. Japanese Atom Energy Agency, Univerisity of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan: Center for Computational Systems and e-Systems Seminar, 2013
  53. University of Utah, Department of Mathematics, Salt Lake City, UT: Applied Mathematics Seminar, 2012
  54. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Introduction to Research Seminar, 2012
  55. Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Chaire d'Analyse et Simulation Numériques, Institut d'Analyse et Calcul Scientifique, Lausanne, Switzerland: Colloque d'Analyse Numériques, 2012
  56. Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire (CERN), Physics Department, Software Division and Information Technology Division, Geneva, Switzerland: CERN Computing Seminar, 2012
  57. Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Departement Mathematik, Seminar für Angewandte Mathematik (SAM), Zürich, Switzerland: SAM Colloquium, 2012
  58. Florida State University, Department of Scientific Computing, Tallahassee, FL: Scientific Computing Seminar, 2012
  59. Institute of Computational Mathematics and Scientific/Engineering Computing, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China, 2012
  60. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Applied Mathematics Seminar, 2012
  61. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Computational Science Seminar, 2012
  62. Michigan State University, Department of Mathematics, East Lansing, MI: Applied Mathematics Colloquium, 2012
  63. Michigan State University, Department of Computer Science, East Lansing, MI: Computer Science Colloquium, 2012
  64. University of Delaware, Department of Computer Science, Newark, DE: Probability and Stochastic Analysis Colloquium, 2012
  65. Appalachian State University, Department of Computer Science, Boone, NC: S-STEM Colloquium, 2012
  66. Florida State University, Department of Scientific Computing, Tallahassee, FL: Scientific Computing Colloquium, 2011
  67. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Introduction to Research Seminar, 2011
  68. Old Dominion University, Department of Computer Science, Norfolk, VA: Computer Science Colloquium, 2011
  69. University of Massachussetts, Department of Mathematics, Amherst, MA: Applied Analysis and Computation Seminar, 2011
  70. Tufts University, Department of Mathematics, Medford, MA: Mathematics Department Colloquium, 2011
  71. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Introduction to Research Seminar, 2011
  72. Florida State University, Intitute for Molecular Biophysics, Tallahassee, FL: Intitute for Molecular Biophysics Colloquium, 2011
  73. University of Delaware, Department of Computer Science, Newark, DE: Computer Science Colloquium, 2011
  74. Army Research Laboratory, Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD: Seminar, 2011
  75. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Applied and Computational Mathematics Division of the Information Technology Laboratory, Gaithersburg, MD: Seminar, 2011
  76. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Statistical Engineering Division of the Information Technology Laboratory, Gaithersburg, MD: Seminar, 2011
  77. National Institutes of Health, National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, Laboratory of Biological Modeling, Bethesda, MD: Seminar, 2011
  78. University of Florida, Department of Physics, Gainesville, FL: High-Energy Physics (HEP) Seminar, 2011
  79. University of California, Department of Mathematics, Berkeley, CA: Applied Mathematics Colloquium, 2010
  80. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Faculty Seminar, 2010
  81. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Introduction to Research Seminar, 2010
  82. Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon, Korea: Monte Carlo Methods Seminar, 2010
  83. Korea University, Department of Industrial Engineering, Seoul, Korea: Graduate Departmental Seminar, 2010
  84. Technishe Universität Wien, Institut für Mikroelekronik, Vienna, Austria: Monte Carlo Methods Seminar, 2010
  85. Technishe Universität Wien, Institut für Mikroelekronik, Vienna, Austria: Graduate Electrical Engineering Seminar, 2010
  86. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Applied Mathematics Colloquium, 2010
  87. University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Department of Computer Science, Computer Science Colloquium, 2010
  88. Washington University in St. Louis, Center for Computational Biology, School of Medicine: Special Seminar, 2010
  89. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Applied Mathematics Seminar, 2010
  90. King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Computational Science Seminar, 2010
  91. Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Tallahassee, FL: Mathematical Biology Seminar, 2009
  92. University of Miami, Department of Computer Science, Miami, FL: Center for Computational Science Colloquium, 2009
  93. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Introduction to Research Seminar, 2008
  94. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Faculty Seminar, 2008
  95. University of Miami, Department of Computer Science, Miami, FL: Department of Computer Science Colloquium, 2008
  96. The National Institute of Informatics, National Research Grid Initiative (NAEGRI), Center for Grid Research and Development, Tokyo, Japan: Institute Seminar, 2008
  97. Weierstraß Institut für Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS), Weierstrass Institute for Applied Analysis and Stochastics, Berlin, Germany: Stochastic Algorithms Seminar, 2007
  98. Université de Toulon et du Var, Institut des Sciences de l'Ingénieur de Toulon et du Var, Modélisation Numérique et Couplages, Toulon, France: Mathematics Colloquium, 2007
  99. Université de Toulon et du Var, Institut des Sciences de l'Ingénieur de Toulon et du Var, Modélisation Numérique et Couplages, Toulon, France: Student Seminar, 2007
  100. Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Tallahassee, FL: Mathematical Biology Seminar, 2007
  101. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Introduction to Research Seminar, 2007
  102. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Faculty Seminar, 2007
  103. Columbia University, The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, Department of Applied Physics and Mathematics, New York, NY: Applied Mathematics Seminar, 2007
  104. The University at Stony Brook, Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics (AMS), Stony Brook, NY: AMS Seminar, 2007
  105. University of Florida, Department of Mathematics, Gainesville, FL: Applied Mathematics Colloquium, 2007
  106. North Carolina State University, Department of Mathematics, Raleigh, NC: Applied Mathematics Seminar, 2007
  107. North Carolina State University, Department of Computer Science, Raleigh, NC: Computer Science Seminar, 2007
  108. University of Florida, Department of Computer Information Sciences and Engineering (CISE), Gainesville, FL: Computer Science Colloquium, 2007
  109. Florida State University, School of Computational Science, Tallahassee, FL: Graduate Student Seminar, 2007
  110. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Introduction to Research Seminar, 2006
  111. Tulane University, Department of Mathematics, New Orleans, LA: Applied Mathematics Seminar, 2006
  112. Louisiana State University, Department of Mathematics, Baton Rouge, LA: Applied Analysis Seminar, 2006
  113. Louisiana State University, Center for Computation and Technology, Baton Rouge, LA: CCT Colloquium, 2006
  114. Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Department of Computer and Information Sciences, Tallahassee, FL: Departmental Colloquium, 2006
  115. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Faculty Research Presentation Series, 2006
  116. U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Center for Computational Science, Washington, DC: Seminar, 2006
  117. U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Electronic Support Measures, Washington, DC: Particles Research Group Seminar, 2006
  118. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Mathematics and Computational Science Division, Gaithersburg, MD: Seminar, 2006
  119. National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Biological Modeling, National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD: Seminar, 2006
  120. Technishe Universität Wien, Institut für Mikroelekronik, Vienna, Austria: Electrical Engineering Guest Lecture, 2006
  121. Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Catholic University of Leuven), Department of Computer Science, Faculty of Engineering, Leuven, Belgium: Numerical Analysis Seminar, 2006
  122. Université Libre de Bruxelles (Free University of Brussels), Service de Métrologie Nucléaire, Brussels, Belgium: Nuclear Engineering Colloquium, 2006
  123. Florida State University-Florida A&M University, Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Tallahassee, FL: Graduate Seminar, 2006
  124. Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, School of Life Sciences, Brain Mind Institute, Laboratory of Neural Microcircuitry, Lausanne, Switzerland: Laboratory Seminar, 2006
  125. Office of Naval Research, Global, London, United Kingdom: Office of Naval Research, Army Research Office, Air Force Office Scientific Research Seminar, 2006
  126. Herriot-Watt University, Department of Mathematics, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom: Industrial and Applied Mathematics Seminar, 2006
  127. Strathclyde University, Department of Mathematics, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom: Numerical Analysis Colloquium, 2006
  128. Universität Ulm, Ulmer Zentrum für Wissenschafliches Rechnen (Ulm Center for Scientific Computing), Ulm, Germany: Forschungsseminar Wissenschaftliches Rechnen (Scientific Computing Research Seminar), 2006
  129. International Business Machines, Computational Chemistry and Materials Science Department, Zürich Research Laboratory, Rüschlikon, Switzerland: Deep Computing Institute Seminar, 2006
  130. Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Computational/Collaborational Laboratory in Computational Science and Engineering (CoLab), Zürich, Switzerland: CoLab Seminar, 2006
  131. Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Departement Mathematik, Seminar für Angewandte Mathematik (SAM), Zürich, Switzerland: SAM Colloquium, 2006
  132. Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Chaire d'Analyse et Simulation Numériques, Institut d'Analyse et Calcul Scientifique, Lausanne, Switzerland: Colloque d'Analyse Numériques, 2006
  133. Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire (CERN), Physics Department, Software Division and Information Technology Division, Geneva, Switzerland: CERN Computing Seminar, 2006
  134. Institut Supérieur d'Informatique, de Modélisation et de leurs Applications (ISIMA), Advanced Institute for Computer Science, Modeling and Applications, Université Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand, France: Modeling and Simulation Seminar, 2006
  135. The Georgia Institute of Technology, College of Computing, Division of Computational Science and Engineering, Atlanta, GA: Computational Science and Engineering Colloquium, 2006
  136. Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Department Informatik, Computer Science Department, Zürich, Switzerland: Theoretical Computer Science Seminar, 2006
  137. Geowatt AG, Swiss Expert Geothermal Group, Zürich, Switzerland: Company Seminar, 2006
  138. Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Rechnergestützte Wissenschaften, Computational Science and Engineering, Zürich, Switzerland: Case Studies Seminar in Computational Science and Engineering (Fallstudien), 2005
  139. Humboldt Universität, Department of Mathematics, Berlin, Germany: Numerical Analysis Seminar, 2005
  140. Weierstraß Institut für Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS), Weierstrass Institute for Applied Analysis and Stochastics, Berlin, Germany: Stochastic Algorithms Seminar, 2005
  141. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Mathematics and Computational Science Division, Gaithersburg, MD: Seminar, 2005
  142. National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Biological Modeling, National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD: Seminar, 2005
  143. Computational Science Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven, NY: Computational Science Center Seminar, 2005
  144. The University at Stony Brook, Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics (AMS), Stony Brook, NY: AMS Seminar, 2005
  145. University of Cyprus, Department of Computer Science, Nicosia, Cyprus: Computer Science Colloquium, 2005
  146. University of Cyprus, Department of Mathematics, Nicosia, Cyprus: Mathematics Colloquium, 2005
  147. University of Pittsburgh, Department of Mathematics, Pittsburgh, PA: Biological Mathematics Colloquium, 2004
  148. University of Miami, Department of Computer Science, Miami, FL: Applied Mathematics Colloquium, 2004
  149. Institut Supérieur d'Informatique, de Modélisation et de leurs Applications (ISIMA), Advanced Institute for Computer Science, Modeling and Applications, Clermont-Ferrand, France: Computer Science Seminar, 2004
  150. Université de Savoie, LAMA, Le Bourget-du-Lac, France: Applied Mathematics Colloquium, 2004
  151. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Introduction to Research Seminar, 2004
  152. Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia: Institute of Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Geophysics (Computing Center), Department of Statistical Modeling in Physics, Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, 2004
  153. Florida State University-Florida A&M University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tallahassee, FL: Graduate Seminar, 2004
  154. Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Tallahassee, FL: Mathematics Colloquium, 2004
  155. Arizona State University, Department of Mathematics, Tempe, AZ: Computational and Applied Mathematics Proseminar, 2003
  156. University of Arizona, Department of Mathematics, Tucson, AZ: Analysis and Its Applications Seminar, 2003
  157. National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Biological Modeling, National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD: Seminar, 2003
  158. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Mathematics and Computational Science Division, Gaithersburg, MD: Seminar, 2003
  159. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Introduction to Research Seminar, 2003
  160. Florida State University-Florida A&M University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tallahassee, FL: Graduate Seminar, 2003
  161. Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Computational/Collaborational Laboratory in Computational Science and Engineering (CoLab), Zürich, Switzerland: CoLab Colloquium, 2003
  162. Seoul National University, Program in Computational Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea: Computer Science and Technology Colloquium, 2003
  163. Kunsan National University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kunsan, South Korea: Mechanical Engineering Colloquium, 2003
  164. Inha University, Department of Physics, Incheon, South Korea: Physics Colloquium, 2003
  165. Seoul National University, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul, Korea: Computer Science Colloquium, 2003
  166. Keio University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics, Yokohama, Japan: Mathematics Colloquium, 2003
  167. Washington University in St. Louis, Center for Computational Biology, School of Medicine: Special Seminar, 2003
  168. University of California, San Diego, Computer Science and Engineering Department, San Diego, CA: Computer Science Seminar, 2003
  169. University of California, Los Angeles, Computer Science Department, Los Angeles, CA: Computer Science Seminar, 2003
  170. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge, TN: Computer Science and Mathematics Seminar, 2003
  171. Universität Kaiserslautern, Fachbereich Informatik, Kaiserslautern, Germany: Computer Science Colloquium, 2002
  172. Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universität Frankfurt am Main, Department of Mathematics, Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Departmental Colloquium, 2002
  173. Universität Heidelberg, Intgerdisziplinäres Institut für wissenschaftliches Rechen (ITWR), Heidelberg, Germany: Scientific Computing Colloquium, 2002
  174. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Introduction to Research Seminar, 2002
  175. National Institutes of Health, Mathematical Research Branch, National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD: Seminar, 2002
  176. Florida State University, School of Computational Science and Information Technology, Tallahassee, FL: Physical Sciences Colloquium, 2002
  177. FH Salzburg: Fachhochschulgesellschaft mbH, Salzburg University of Applied Sciences & Technology, School of Telecommunication Engineering, Salzburg, Austria: Colloquium, 2002
  178. Universität Salzburg, Institut für Scientific Computing, Salzburg, Austria: Scientific Computing Colloquium, 2002
  179. Università degli Studi di Bologna, Bologna, Italy: Seminario di Matematica, 2002
  180. Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy: Seminario di Analisi Numerica, 2002
  181. Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy: Seminario di Matematica, 2002
  182. Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania, Italy: Seminario di Analisi Numerica, 2002
  183. Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania, Italy: Seminario di Informatica, 2002
  184. Universität Salzburg, Institut für Mathematik, Salzburg, Austria: Mathematics Colloquium, 2002
  185. Technishe Universität Wien, Institut für Mikroelekronik, Vienna, Austria: Electrical Engineering Guest Lecture, 2002
  186. Université Libre de Bruxelles (Free University of Brussels), Service de Métrologie Nucléaire, Brussels, Belgium: Nuclear Engineering Colloquium, 2002
  187. Florida Atlantic University, Department of Physics, Boca Raton, FL: Physics Colloquium, 2002
  188. Florida State University, Department of Statistics, Tallahassee, FL: Statistics Colloquium, 2002
  189. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Computer Science Colloquium, 2002
  190. New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York, NY: Applied Mathematics Seminar, 2001
  191. National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, Laboratory of Experimental and Computational Biology, Frederick, MD: Seminar, 2001
  192. National Institutes of Health, Mathematical Research Branch, National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD: Seminar, 2001
  193. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Mathematics and Computational Science Division, Gaithersburg, MD: Seminar, 2001
  194. University of South Carolina, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Columbia, SC: Computer Science and Engineering Colloquium, 2001
  195. University of South Carolina, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Columbia, SC: Invited Lecture, Computational Science, 2001
  196. Emory University, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Atlanta, GA: Mathematics and Computer Science Colloquium, 2001
  197. Emory University, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Atlanta, GA: Computational Mathematics Seminar, 2001
  198. Florida State University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tallahassee, FL: Chemical Engineering Colloquium, 2001
  199. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA: Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) Colloquium, 2001
  200. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA: Monte Carlo Seminar (A-Division), 2001
  201. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA: InternComputer Scienceships in Terascale Simulation Technology (ITST) Lecture, 2001
  202. Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria: Central Laboratory for Parallel Processing Colloquium, 2001
  203. Weierstraß Institut für Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS), Weierstrass Institute for Applied Analysis and Stochastics, Berlin, Germany: Stochastic Algorithms Seminar, 2001
  204. Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich, Switzerland: Vector and Parallel Computing Colloquium, 2001
  205. Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich, Switzerland: Applied and Numerical Mathematics Colloquium, 2001
  206. Università degli Studi di Roma Una "La Sapienza", Rome, Italy: Seminario di Analisi Numerica, 2001
  207. Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique (INRIA), Sophia-Antipolis, France: Omega Project Seminar, 2001
  208. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Computational and Applied Mathematics, Gaithersburg, MD:  Seminar, 2001
  209. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge, TN: Computer Science and Mathematics Seminar, 2001
  210. Florida State University, Center for Materials Research and Technology (MARTECH), Tallahassee, FL: Martech Seminar, 2001
  211. Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Tallahassee, FL: Computer Science Colloquium, 2001
  212. Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Tallahassee, FL: Mathematics Colloquium, 2001
  213. Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Tallahassee, FL: Introduction to Research Seminar, 2001
  214. Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Tallahassee, FL: Symbolic Computing Seminar, 2001
  215. Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Tallahassee, FL: FSU Mathematics Society Seminar, 2001
  216. Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Tallahassee, FL: Complex Analysis Seminar, 2001
  217. Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Tallahassee, FL: Mathematics Colloquium, 2000
  218. Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Tallahassee, FL: Cryptography Seminar, 2000
  219. University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Computer Science, Santa Barbara, CA: Computer Science Colloquium, 2000
  220. University of Tokyo, Financial Engineering Department, Tokyo, Japan: Financial Engineering Seminar, 2000
  221. Universität Salzburg, Department of Computer Science, Salzburg, Austria: Computer Science Seminar, 2000
  222. Florida A&M University-Florida State University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Tallahassee, FL: Graduate Seminar, 2000
  223. Stetson University, Department of Mathematics, Deland, FL: Mathematics Colloquium, 1999
  224. Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Tallahassee, FL: Mathematics Colloquium, 1999
  225. Florida State University, Department of Statistics, Tallahassee, FL: Statistics Colloquium, 1999
  226. Universität Salzburg, Institut für Mathematik, Salzburg, Austria: Mathematics Colloquium,1999
  227. Universität Salzburg, Institut für Mathematik, Salzburg, Austria: pLab Group Seminar, 1999
  228. Bettis Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA: Joint Bettis, KAPL, and Naval Reactors Seminar, 1999
  229. Bettis Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA: Reactor Methods and Programming Seminar, 1999
  230. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, NERSC, Berkeley, CA: Scientific Computing Seminar, 1999
  231. University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN: Innovative Computing Laboratory (Computer Science) Seminar, 1999
  232. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN: Center for Computational Science Seminar, 1999
  233. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI: Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences Colloquium, 1999
  234. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI: Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences Monte Carlo Seminar, 1999
  235. University of Texas, Austin, TX: Texas Institute for Computational and Applied Mathematics Seminar, 1999
  236. Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL: Computer Science Seminar, 1999
  237. Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL: Computational Science and Engineering Seminar, 1999
  238. NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA: ICASE Colloquium, 1999
  239. Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA: Computer Science Colloquium, 1999
  240. Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS: Mathematics Colloquium, 1998
  241. University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS: Mathematics Colloquium, 1998
  242. University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS: Computer Science Seminar, 1998
  243. Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS: Undergraduate Mathematics Seminar, 1998
  244. Tulane University, New Orleans, LA: Applied Mathematics Seminar, 1998
  245. Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS: Information Technology Laboratory Colloquium, 1998
  246. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA: Colloquium, 1998
  247. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD: Information Technology Laboratory Seminar, 1998
  248. University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL: NCSA Colloquium, 1998
  249. University of Chicago, Chicago, IL: Computer Science Colloquium, 1998
  250. University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY: Computational ScienceComputer Science Center Colloquium, 1998
  251. Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM: Massively Parallel Computing Research Laboratory Seminar, 1997
  252. Rice University, Houston, TX: Center for Research in Parallel Computing Colloquium, 1997
  253. Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS: Graduate Student Seminar (Computer Science), 1997
  254. University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT: Applied Mathematics Seminar, 1997
  255. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM: Monte Carlo Seminar, 1997
  256. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA: Monte Carlo Seminar, 1997
  257. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: CESDIS Colloquium, 1997
  258. Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN: Computer Sciences Colloquium, 1997
  259. Argonne National Laboratory, IL: Reactor Analysis Seminar, 1997
  260. University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI: Numerical Analysis Seminar, 1997
  261. University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA: Mathematics Colloquium, 1997
  262. Catholic University of America, Washington, DC: Mathematics Colloquium, 1996
  263. University of Southern Mississippi; Hattiesburg, MS: Scientific Computing Colloquium, 1996
  264. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA: NERSC Colloquium, 1996
  265. Università degli Studi di Padova; Padova, Italy: Seminario di Analisi Numerica, 1996
  266. Università degli Studi di Milano; Milano, Italy: Seminario di Matematica, 1996
  267. Università degli Studi di Bologna; Bologna, Italy: Seminario di Matematica, 1996
  268. University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI: Numerical Analysis Seminar, 1996
  269. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL: Computer Science Colloquium, 1996
  270. San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA: Mathematics Colloquium, 1996
  271. IBM-T. J. Watson Laboratory, Yorktown Heights, NY: Physical Sciences Seminar, 1996
  272. University of Maryland, College Park, MD: Numerical Analysis Seminar, 1996
  273. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI: Special Nuclear Engineering Seminar, 1996
  274. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI: Special Applied Mathematics Seminar, 1996
  275. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL: Computer Science Colloquium, 1996
  276. Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD: Applied Mathematics Special Seminar, 1996
  277. Virginia Tech., Blacksburg, VA: Graduate Seminar Series, Department of Computer Science, 1995
  278. NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA: NAS New Technology Seminar (Two Talks Given), 1995
  279. SUNY, Stony Brook, NY: Joint AMS/BNL Applied Mathematics Seminar, 1995
  280. Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences-NYU, New York, NY: Modeling and Simulation Seminar, 1995
  281. Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA: Computer Science Colloquium, 1995
  282. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC: Computational Neuroscience Seminar, 1995
  283. Catholic University of America, Washington, DC: Mathematics Colloquium, 1995
  284. University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ: Computer Science Colloquium, 1994
  285. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ: Computational and Applied Mathematics Proseminar, 1994
  286. University of Illinois, Champaign, IL: Condensed Matter Physics Colloquium, 1994
  287. George Washington University, Washington, DC: Mathematics Department Colloquium, 1994
  288. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD: Computational and Applied Mathematics Laboratory Seminar, 1994
  289. IDA Center for Communications Research-La Jolla, San Diego, CA: Colloquium, 1994
  290. Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences-NYU, New York, NY: Numerical Analysis Seminar, 1994
  291. AT&T, Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ: Mathematics of Communications Division Colloquium, 1994
  292. Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.: Computer Science Colloquium, 1994
  293. NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA: NAS-RIACS Seminar, 1993
  294. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA: Parallel Computing Seminar, 1993
  295. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA: Parallel Computing Seminar, 1993
  296. The American University, Washington, DC: Mathematics Colloquium, 1993
  297. Baltimore-Washington Local SIAM Dinner, College Park, MD: Meeting Seminar, 1992
  298. Bell Communications Research, Morristown, NJ: Mathematics Colloquium, 1992
  299. Columbia University, New York, NY, Applied Physics: Colloquium, 1992
  300. IBM Corporation, Kingston, NY: Mathematical Sciences Seminar, 1992
  301. University of Maryland, Baltimore County, MD, Mathematics: Applied Mathematics Colloquium, 1992
  302. University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, Mathematics: Nonlinear Analysis Seminar, 1991
  303. University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, Mathematics: Numerical Analysis Seminar, 1991
  304. SUNY, Stony Brook, NY, Applied Mathematics: Computational Mathematics Seminar, 1991
  305. University of California, Los Angeles, CA, Computer Science: Seminar, 1991
  306. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, Applied Mathematics: Seminar, 1991
  307. Thinking Machines Corporation, Cambridge, MA: Guest Lecture, 1991
  308. BBN Inc., Cambridge, MA: Applied and Computational Mathematics Colloquium, 1991
  309. Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, Mathematical Sciences: Seminar, 1991
  310. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD: Computational and Applied Mathematics Seminar, 1991
  311. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC: Acoustics Branch Seminar, 1990
  312. IBM-T. J. Watson Laboratory, Yorktown Heights, NY: Mathematical Sciences Seminar, 1990
  313. NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA: NAS-RIACS Seminar, 1990
  314. Yale University, New Haven, CT, Computer Science: Seminar, 1990
  315. John von Neumann National Supercomputer Center, Princeton, NJ: Colloquium, 1990
  316. University of Maryland, College Park, MD: Numerical Analysis Seminar, 1989
  317. Washington Area Connection Machine User's Group, Catholic University of America., Washington, DC: Meeting Seminar, 1989
  318. Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences-NYU, New York, NY: Applied Mathematics Seminar, 1989
  319. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C., Connection Machine Facility: Seminar, 1989
  320. NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD: Seminar, 1989
  321. Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences-NYU, New York, NY: Parallel Computation Seminar, 1988
  322. Division of Computer Research and Technology, NIH, Bethesda, MD: Seminar, 1988
  323. Supercomputing Research Center, Bowie, MD: Colloquium, 1988
  324. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, Computation and Neural Systems: Seminar, 1988
  325. Mathematical Research Branch, NIDDK, NIH, Bethesda, MD: Seminar, 1987
  326. National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD: Mathematical Biology Seminar, 1987
  327. Tulane University, New Orleans, LA: Mathematics Colloquium, 1987
  328. Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences-NYU, New York, NY: Numerical Analysis Seminar, 1987
  329. Hunter College, New York, NY: Computer Science Colloquium, 1987
  330. Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences-NYU., New York, NY: Mathematical Biology Seminar, 1987

Invited Conference Presentations:

  1. 10th International Conference on Large Scale Scientific Computing (LSSC15), The Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sozopol, Bulgaria: 25-minute invited talk entitled: Gaussian Variant of Freivalds' Algorithm for Efficient and Reliable Matrix Product Verification (June, 2015)
  2. The 2014 Conference on High-Performance Computing and Simulation (HPCS2014), Savoia Hotel Regency, Bologna, Italy: 60-minute invited talk entitled: Random Number Generation Tools for Distributed Simulation on Modern HPC Architectures (July, 2014)
  3. 22nd High Performance Computing Symposium (HPC 2014), part of the SCS Spring Simulation Multiconference (SpringSim '14), Tampa, FL: 60-minute invited talk entitled: Monte Carlo Methods and Partial Differential Equations: Algorithms and Implications for High-Performance Computing (April, 2014)
  4. 9th International Conference on Large Scale Scientific Computing (LSSC13), The Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sozopol, Bulgaria: 45-minute invited plenary talk entitled: Monte Carlo Methods and Partial Differential Equations: Algorithms and Implications for High-Performance Computing (June, 2013)
  5. 41st SPEEDUP Workshop (25th Anniversary) on High-Performance Computing, The SPEEDUP Society, The SWISS forum for Grid and High Performance Computing, ETH-Zürich, Zürich Switzerland: 45-minute invited plenary talk entitled: Monte Carlo Methods: Early History and Modern Developments (September, 2012)
  6. Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC) Symposium Workshop on Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations (NASPDE12), University of Warwick, Warwick, UK: 40-minute invited talk entitled: Novel Stochastic Methods in Biochemical Electrostatics (June, 2012)
  7. The Archimedes Center for Modeling, Analysis, and Computation (ACMAC) workshop on Stochastic Partial Differential Equations, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece: 50-minute invited talk entitled: Stochastic Methods for Solving Deterministic PDE Systems Can Beat Deterministic Methods. An Example in Biochemical Electrostatics (June, 2011)
  8. ULAM100: Ulam Centennial Conference, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL: 60-minute invited talk entitled: Monte Carlo Methods: Early History and the basics (March, 2009)
  9. SC08: International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, Austin, TX: 90-minute invited talk in the Educational Program entitled: SPRNG Awakenings; Random Numbers, Monte Carlo, Parallel Computing: Toxic Mix? (November, 2008)
  10. ACS 2008: The American Chemical Society Annual Meeting, Special Session on Computational Chemistry, Philadelphia, PA: 45-minute invited talk entitled: Novel Stochastic Methods in Biochemical Electrostatics. (August, 2008)
  11. FAME 2008: The Florida Annual Meeting and Exposition, sponsored by the Florida Section of the American Chemical Society, Orlando, FL: 30-minute invited in the Biophysics Symposium entitled: Novel Stochastic Methods in Biochemical Electrostatics. (May, 2008)
  12. PDCoF 2008: Parallel and Distributed Computing in Finance (Computational Finance) in conjunction with IPDPS08, Miami, FL: 55-minute keynote talk entitled: Random Number Generation for Serial, Parallel, Distributed, and Grid-based Financial Computations. (April, 2008)
  13. Symposium: Applied Characterization of Random Number Generators and Related Topics, Institute of Statistical Mathematics , Tokyo, Japan, 30-minute invited talk entitled Random Number Generation: A Practitioner's Overview. (January, 2008)
  14. SC07: International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, Educational Program, Reno, NV: 120-minute invited talk entitled Monte Carlo in Reno. (November, 2007)
  15. ICIAM 2007: The Sixth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Zürich, Switzerland: invited minisymposium Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) with membership in a 60-minute invited panel entitled: CSE has landed: who will give it a home and budget? (July, 2007)
  16. ICIAM 2007: The Sixth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Zürich, Switzerland: 30-minute invited minisymposium Stochastic Numerics: Monte-Carlo methods, SDEs, PDEs with a talk entitled: Recent Developments in the Scalable Parallel Random-Number Generators (SPRNG) Library. (July, 2007)
  17. ICIAM 2007: The Sixth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Zürich, Switzerland: 30-minute invited minisymposium Stochastic Numerics: Monte-Carlo methods, SDEs, PDEs with a talk entitled: Monte-Carlo Methods for Problems in Biological Electrostatics. (July, 2007)
  18. ICIAM 2007: The Sixth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Zürich, Switzerland: 30-minute invited minisymposium Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) with a talk entitled: Computational Science Education in the United States. (July, 2007)
  19. MCM2007:  The Sixth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Reading University, Reading, UK: 60-minute invited talk entitled: Monte Carlo Methods for Partial Differential Equations . (June, 2007)
  20. Grid Computing Symposium, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University, Greensboro, NC: 45-minute invited talk entitled: Grid Computing at FSU . (April, 2007)
  21. Workshop on Numerics for Stochastic Differential Equations and Application, School of Computational Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL: 60-minute invited talk entitled: Using Simple SDEs (Stochastic Differential Equations) to Solve Complicated PDEs (Partial Differential Equations) . (September, 2005)
  22. Workshop on Computational Stochastic Differential Equations, The Mathematical Research and Conference Center, Institute of Mathematics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Będlewo (Poznań), Poland: 30-minute invited talk entitled: A Monte Carlo Method for Solving Boundary-Value Problems Arising in Continuum Molecular Electrostatics. (September, 2005)
  23. 17th IMACS World Congress, Scientific Computation, Applied Mathematics and Simulation, IMACS 2005, Paris, France: 25-minute invited talk in the Workshop on Large-Scale Linear Algebra Grid Computing entitled: A Bio-Inspired Job Scheduling Algorithm for Monte Carlo Applications on a Computational Grid. (July, 2005)
  24. 17th IMACS World Congress, Scientific Computation, Applied Mathematics and Simulation, IMACS 2005, Paris, France: 25-minute invited talk in the Workshop on Monte Carlo Methods for PDEs and Applications in Turbulence, Biochemistry, and Finance entitled (presented by co-author Nikolai Simonov): The Method of Random Walk on Spheres for Solving Boundary-Value problems for Molecular Electrostatics. (July, 2005)
  25. 17th IMACS World Congress, Scientific Computation, Applied Mathematics and Simulation, IMACS 2005, Paris, France: 25-minute invited talk in the Workshop on Monte Carlo Methods for PDEs and Applications in Turbulence, Biochemistry, and Finance entitled: Computational Investigation of Optimal Quasirandom Sequences in Numerical Finance. (July, 2005)
  26. Fifth International Conference on Computational Science: ICCS 2005, Emory University, Atlanta, GA: 25-minute invited talk in the Workshop on Parallel Monte Carlo Algorithms for Diverse Applications in a Distributed Setting entitled: An Efficient Monte Carlo Approach for Solving Linear Problems of Biomolecular Electrostatics. (May, 2005)
  27. Fifth International Conference on Computational Science: ICCS 2005, Emory University, Atlanta, GA: 25-minute invited talk in the Workshop on Parallel Monte Carlo Algorithms for Diverse Applications in a Distributed Setting entitled: On the Scrambled Soboĺ Sequence. (May, 2005)
  28. Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics 2005 Conference on Computational Science and Engineering, Orlando, FL: 30-minute invited talk in the Minisymposium on Monte Carlo Computations in Biology and Materials Science entitled: Monte Carlo Methods in Biological Electrostatics. (February 2005)
  29. Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics 2005 Conference on Computational Science and Engineering, Orlando, FL: 30-minute invited talk in the Minisymposium on Critical Issues in the Application of Multi-scale Techniques to Computational Nanotechnology entitled (presented by co-author Ashok Srinivasan): Continuum Molecular Electrostatics via Monte Carlo Methods. (February 2005)
  30. American Mathematical Society 2004 Spring Southeastern Section Meeting, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL: 30-minute invited talk in the Special Session on Application of Mathematics to Problems in Biology entitled: Monte Carlo Methods for Calculating Some Physical Properties of a Large Molecule. (March, 2004)
  31. Seventh Joint Conference on Information Sciences (JCIS 2003)/Seventh International Conference on Computer Science and Informatics, Research Triangle Park, NC: 40-minute invited talk entitled: Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods for Some Problems in Linear Algebra. (September, 2003)
  32. Fourth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Berlin, Germany: 20-minute invited talk entitled: Grid-based Quasi-Monte Carlo Applications. (September, 2003)
  33. Fourth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Berlin, Germany: 20-minute invited talk entitled (presented by co-author Nikolai Simonov): Random Walk Algorithms for the Estimation of Effective Properties for Digitized Porous Media. (September, 2003)
  34. Fourth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Berlin, Germany: 20-minute invited talk entitled: On the Scrambled Halton Sequence. (September, 2003)
  35. Fourth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Berlin, Germany: 20-minute invited talk entitled (presented by co-author Aneta Karaivanova): Parallel Quasirandom Walks on the Boundary. (September, 2003)
  36. Fourth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Berlin, Germany: 20-minute invited talk entitled (presented by co-author Abdujabar Rasulov): Branching Random Walks Using Quasirandom Sequences.  Is That Possible? (September, 2003)
  37. Fifth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM 2003), Sydney, Australia: 30-minute invited minisymposium talk entitled:  Computing the Capacitance of the Unit Cube to High Accuracy. (July, 2003)
  38. Fifth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM 2003), Sydney, Australia: 30-minute invited minisymposium talk entitled:  Monte Carlo Methods for Computing Electrostatic Internal Energies of Large Molecules. (July, 2003)
  39. Fourth International Conference on Large-Scale Scientific Computations (LSSC'03), Sozopol, Bulgaria: 50-minute invited plenary talk entitled:  Computational Infrastructure for Parallel, Distributed, and Grid-based Monte Carlo Computations. (June, 2003)
  40. Algorithms and Complexity for Continuous Problems: Schloss Dagstuhl International Conference and Research Center for Computer Science, Dagstuhl, Germany:  25-minute invited talk (presented by co-author Emanouil Atanassov) entitled Efficient Generation of Low Discrepancy Sequences. (September 2002)
  41. Algorithms and Complexity for Continuous Problems: Schloss Dagstuhl International Conference and Research Center for Computer Science,, Dagstuhl, Germany:  25-minute invited talk (presented by co-author Aneta Karaivanova) entitled Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods for Some Linear Algebra Problems, Convergence and Complexity. (September 2002)
  42. Fifth International Conference on Numerical Methods and Applications (MN&A 02), Borovets, Bulgaria; 45-minute invited plenary talk entitled Stochastic Methods for Partial Differential Equations: Avoiding Complicated Deterministic Constructs in Applications. (August 2002)
  43. Institute for Mathematics and It's Applications, Foundations of Computational Mathematics 2002, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; 50-minute invited semiplenary talk entitled Stochastic Methods for Partial Differential Equations: Theory and Applications. (August 2002)
  44. Centre de Recherché Mathematiques: Workshop on Random Number Generation and Highly Uniform Uniform Point Sets, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada: 60-minute invited talk entitled Random Number Requirements of Large Monte Carlo Applications: A Developer's Perspective. (June 2002)
  45. Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators (SPRNG) Workshop, Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM: a 120-minute invited  talk entitled Recent Developments and Future Plans for the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators (SPRNG) Library. (February, 2002)
  46. Third IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Salzburg, Austria: 30-minute invited talk entitled A Feynman-Kac Formula Implementation for the Linearized Poisson-Boltzmann Equation.  (September, 2001)
  47. European Conference on Numerical Mathematics Advanced Applications 2001, Ischia Porto, Naples, Italy: 25-minute invited minisymposium talk entitled Continuous Path Brownian Trajectories for Diffusion Monte Carlo Via First- and Last-Passage Distributions, (July 2001)
  48. European Conference on Numerical Mathematics Advanced Applications 2001, Ischia Porto, Naples, Italy: 25-minute invited minisymposium talk entitled SPRNG: A Scalable Library for Pseudorandom Number Generation, (July 2001)
  49. European Conference on Numerical Mathematics Advanced Applications 2001, Ischia Porto, Naples, Italy: 25-minute invited minisymposium talk entitled Feynman-Kac Path-Integral Implementation for Poisson's Equation Using an F-conditioned Green's Function, presented by C.-O. Hwang, (July 2001)
  50. Third International Conference on Large-Scale Scientific Computations, Sozopol, Bulgaria: 30-minute invited talk entitled Continuous Path Brownian Trajectories for Diffusion Monte Carlo Via First- and Last-Passage Distributions, (June 2001)
  51. The 2001 International Conference on Computational Science, San Francisco, CA: 20-minute invited minisymposium talk entitled A Feynman-Kac Path-Integral Implementation for Poisson's Equation, presented by C.-O. Hwang, (May 2001)
  52. Journées savoisiennes de mathématiques appliquées, Methodes Particulaires de Simulation Numerique (Particle Methods for Numerical Simulation), Université de Savoie, Le Bourget-du-Lac, France: 60-minute invited talk entitled New Monte Carlo Methods for Problems in Materials and Biology. (May, 2001)
  53. The Fourth International Conference on Supercomputing in Nuclear Applications, Toranoman-Pastoral, Tokyo, Japan: 35-minute invited talk entitled Theory and Software for Parallel Random Number Generation. (September, 2000)
  54. Numerical Methods and Applications, Sofia, Bulgaria: 35-minute Invited Talk entitled SPRNG: A Scalable Library for Pseudorandom Number Generation. (July 1998)
  55. NATO Advanced Study Institute: Quantum Monte Carlo Methods in Physics and Chemistry, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY: 90-minute talk entitled Serial and Parallel Random Number Generation: Theory and Practice. (June 1998)
  56. American Nuclear Society Mathematics and Computation Division, American Nuclear Society Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN: 90-minute roundtable entitled Current Issues in Computational Methods. (June 1998)
  57. Programming Environment and Training Workshop entitled "High-Performance Monte Carlo Tools," Stennis Space Center, MS: 45-minute invited talk entitled Future Trends in Random Number Generation. (April 1998)
  58. Institute for Mathematics and Its Applications, Special Year in High Performance Computing: Workshop on Algorithms for Parallel Processing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN: 60-minute talk entitled A Scalable Library for Pseudorandom Number Generation: Theory and Practice. (September, 1996)
  59. Centre de Recherché Mathematiques: Workshop on Pseudorandom Number Generation, Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada; 90-minute talk entitled A Scalable Library for Pseudorandom Number Generation: Theory and Practice. (June 1996)
  60. DARPA/ITO Computing Systems and Software Principal Investigator's Meeting, San Antonio, TX; 10-minute talk entitled Scalable Pseudorandom Number Generation Tools for Monte Carlo Computations. (March 1996)
  61. Mathematical Sciences Institute Workshop on Stochastic Modeling, The University at Stony Brook, NY; 30-minute invited talk entitled A Gradient Random Walk Method for Two-Dimensional Reaction-Diffusion Equations. (January 1995)
  62. Argonne Theory Institute; Parallel Monte Carlo Simulation: Issues, Tools, and Techniques; Argonne National Laboratory, IL: 2-hour invited talk entitled Parallel Monte Carlo Methods for Partial Differential Equations. (June 1990)
  63. West Virginia University Conference on Computational Research on Materials, Morgantown, WV, invited talk entitled Techniques of Parallel Processing: The Need for New Algorithms. (March 1990)
  64. AMS/IMS/SIAM Conference on "Statistical Multiple Integration'', Arcata, CA: invited talk entitled Random Walks, Elliptic Equations, and Massively Parallel Computing. (June 1989)
  65. SIGGRAPH `88, Atlanta, GA; invited talk to the International Iris User Forum on Scientific Visualization entitled Simulation of Networks of Neurons and scientific images contributed to Scientific Visualization, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications' contribution to the SIGGRAPH `88 Video and Animation Show. (August 1988)

Contributed Conference Presentations:

  1. ICCS2016: International Conference on Computational Science 2016, San Diego, CA: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: Acceleration and Parallelization of ZENO/Walk-on-Spheres. (June, 2016)
  2. ExaMath13: DOE Workshop on Applied Mathematics Research for Exascale Computing, American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC: 10-minute contributed talk entitled: Monte Carlo Methods are Perfectly Situated to Enable Exascale Scientific Computing. (August, 2013)
  3. MCM2013:  The Ninth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Université de Savoie, Annecy, France: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: SGLCG: A Scalable Linear Congruential Generator for SPRNG and CUDA. (July, 2013)
  4. Institute of Mathematics and Its Application Workshop on Solvation, Minneapolis, MN: poster entitled Novel Stochastic Methods in Biochemical Electrostatics. (December, 2008)
  5. SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, Atlanta, GA: minisymposium entitled Parallel Stochastic Methods in Computational Biology, 30-minute contributed talk entitled Novel Stochastic Methods in Biochemical Electrostatics. (March, 2008)
  6. SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, Atlanta, GA: minisymposium entitled Parallel Stochastic Methods in Computational Biology, 30-minute contributed talk entitled Estimation of Migration Rates and Effective Population Numbers by Using Importance Sampling, presented for authors Hongmei Chi and Peter Beerli. (March, 2008)
  7. SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, Atlanta, GA: poster entitled The Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators (SPRNG) Library Version 4.0, with co-author Jane Ren. (March, 2008)
  8. SC07: International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, Technical Program, Reno, NV: poster entitled Decentralized Replica Exchange Parallel Tempering: An Efficient Implementation of Parallel Tempering using MPI and SPRNG, with co-authors Yaohang Li and Andrey Gorin. (November, 2007)
  9. Society for Neuroscience 2007 Annual Meeting, Neuroscience 2007, San Diego, CA: presentation 925.7, poster entitled: Spontaneous Episodic Activity: Why Episode Duration is Correlated with the Length of the Preceding but not Following Interval, with co-authors Joël Tabak and Richard Bertram. (November, 2007)
  10. MCM2007:  The Sixth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Reading University, Reading, UK: 30-minute contributed talk (presented by co-author Bart Vandewoestyne) entitled: An Empirical Investigation of Different Scrambling Methods for Faure Sequences. (June, 2007)
  11. MCM2007:  The Sixth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Reading University, Reading, UK: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: Monte Carlo Methods for Calculating Coefficient Dependence in Poisson-Boltzmann Problems. (June, 2007)
  12. MCM2007:  The Sixth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Reading University, Reading, UK: 30-minute contributed talk on behalf of Wesley Petersen entitled: Playing with Parallelism with Playstations. (June, 2007)
  13. GFMC40:  A Symposium Celebrating 40 Years of Green's Function Monte Carlo, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY: 15-minute contributed talk entitled: Monte Carlo Methods for Partial Differential Equations . (May, 2007)
  14. Applications of Mathematics in Biology, Physiology, and Medicine, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: Using Simple SDEs (Stochastic Differential Equations) to Solve Complicated PDEs (Partial Differential Equations) . (October, 2006)
  15. Schweizer Numerik Kolloquium/Colloque Numérique Suisse 2006, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Chaire d'Analyse et Simulation Numériques, Institut d'Analyse et Calcul Scientifique, Lausanne, Switzerland: contributed poster entitled: Monte Carlo Methods for Partial Differential Equations: Computing Permeability. (April, 2006)
  16. International Conference on Differential Equations: From Theory to Computational Science and Engineering, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH Zürich), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich, Switzerland: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: Stochastic Method for Elliptic Problems: Applications to Biological and Materials Science.  (October, 2005)
  17. Fifth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods: MCM2005, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL: 25-minute contributed talk (presented by co-author Hongmei Chi) entitled: Combined LCGs with Sophie-Germain Moduli.  (May, 2005)
  18. Fifth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods: MCM2005, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL: 25-minute contributed talk (presented by co-author Yaohang Li) entitled: Test of the Rule 30 Cellular Automata Random Number Generator.  (May, 2005)
  19. Fifth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods: MCM2005, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL: 25-minute contributed talk (presented by co-author Abdujabor Rasulov) entitled: Monte Carlo Solution of Initial Boundary Problem for Some Nonlinear Parabolic Equations.  (May, 2005)
  20. Fifth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods: MCM2005, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL: 25-minute contributed talk entitled: Monte Carlo Applications on the Computational Grid.  (May, 2005)
  21. Fifth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods: MCM2005, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL: 25-minute contributed talk (presented by co-author Nikolai Simonov) entitled: Random Walk Algorithms for Solving some Boundary-Value Problems in Biomolecular Electrostatics.  (May, 2005)
  22. Algorithmes et Applications Paralleles en Algebre Linear (Parallel Matrix Algorithms and Applications): PMAA04, Centre International de Rencontres Mathématiques (CIRM), Luminy, France: 25-minute contributed talk entitled: A Monte Carlo Scheme for Load Balancing.  (October, 2004)
  23. International Association for the Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference: e-Society 2004, Avila, Spain: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: E-Science Workflow on the Grid.  (July, 2004)
  24. The International Conference on Computational Mathematics, Novosibirsk, Russia: 30-minute contributed talk (presented by co-author Nikolai Simonov) entitled: Random Walk Algorithms for Estimating Electrostatic Properties of Large Molecules.  (June, 2004)
  25. Sixth International Conference on Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing and the Second International Conference on Monte Carlo and Probabilistic Methods for Partial Differential Equations (MC²QMC2004), Juan-Les-Pins, France: 30-minute contributed talk (presented by co-author Emanouil Atanassov) entitled: Efficient Generation of Low-discrepancy Sequences.  (June, 2004)
  26. Sixth International Conference on Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing and the Second International Conference on Monte Carlo and Probabilistic Methods for Partial Differential Equations (MC²QMC2004), Juan-Les-Pins, France: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: On the Scrambled Soboĺ Sequence.  (June, 2004)
  27. Computational Finance 2004, Bologna, Italy: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: Optimal Quasi-Monte Carlo Valuation of Derivative Securities.  (April, 2004)
  28. The International Conference on Computational Science, St. Petersburg, Russia: 30-minute contributed talk (presented by co-author Nikolai Simonov) entitled:  Monte Carlo Method for Calculating the Electrostatic Energy of a Molecule. (June, 2003)
  29. First International Workshop on Biomedical Computations on the Grid-BioGrid'03, Tokyo, Japan: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: Grid-based Nonequilibrium Multiple-Time Scale Molecular Dynamics/Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Ligand-Receptor Interactions in Structured Protein Systems.  (May, 2003)
  30. Third IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Cluster Computing and the Grid-CCGrid2003, Tokyo, Japan, 30-minute contributed talk entitled: Improving Performance via Computational Replication on a Large-Scale Computational Grid.  (May, 2003)
  31. Grid Computing-GRID 2002, Baltimore, MD: 30-minute contributed talk (presented by co-author Yaohang Li) entitled: Grid-Based Monte Carlo Application.  (November, 2002)
  32. The International Conference on Computational Mathematics, Novosibirsk, Russia: 30-minute contributed talk (presented by co-author Nikolai Simonov) entitled: Random Walk on the Boundary Methods for Computing Reaction Rate and Capacitance.  (June, 2002)
  33. The American Physical Society Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, Indiana: 20-minute contributed talk (presented by co-author Chi-Ok Hwang) entitled: First- and Last-passage Algorithms for Charge Density Calculations on a Conducting Surface.  (March, 2002).
  34. Third IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Salzburg, Austria: 35-minute contributed talk entitled: First- and Last-Passage Diffusion: Key Concepts in the Study of Porous and Composite Media.  (September, 2001)
  35. Third IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Salzburg, Austria: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: A Feynman-Kac Path-Integral Implementation for Poisson's Equation Using an h-conditioned Green's Function.  (September, 2001)
  36. Fourth International Conference on Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing, Hong Kong, China: 25-minute contributed talk entitled: Parallel Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods for Computing Extremal Eigenvalues.  (November 2000)
  37. International Conference on Parallel Processing 2000 Workshop on Scalable Web Services, Toronto, Canada: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: The Cycle Server: A Web Platform for Running Parallel Monte Carlo Applications on a Heterogeneous Condor Pool of Workstations.  (August, 2000)
  38. International Conference on Monte Carlo and Probabilistic Methods for Partial Differential Equations, Monte Carlo, Monaco: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: Quasi-Monte Carlo for Elliptic Boundary Value Problems.  (July, 2000)
  39. International Conference on Monte Carlo and Probabilistic Methods for Partial Differential Equations, Monte Carlo, Monaco: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: A New Fluid Permeability Estimation in Period Grain Consolidation Models of Overlapping and Nonoverlapping Sphere Models of Porous Media.  (July, 2000)
  40. International Conference on Monte Carlo Simulations, Monte Carlo, Monaco: 30-minute contributed talk entitled: Parallel Inversive Congruential Generators:  Software and Field-Programmable Gate Array Implementations.  (June, 2000)
  41. Ninth SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, San Antonio, TX: Organizer and participant in a 2-hour Minisymposium entitled: Algorithms and Software for Parallel and Distributed Monte Carlo Computations.  (March ,1999)
  42. First Southern Symposium on Computing, Hattiesburg, MS: Organizer, moderator, and participant in a 2-hour Minisymposium entitled: Random Number Generation and Monte Carlo Research at USM.  (December 1998)
  43. SC'98, Orlando, FL: Organizer, moderator, and participant in a 150-minute panel entitled: Producing Computational Science Students Ready to Work.  (November, 1998)
  44. Third International Conference on Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing, Claremont, CA: 25-minute talk entitled: SPRNG: A Scalable Library for Monte Carlo Applications.  (July, 1998)
  45. Third International Conference on Monte Carlo and Quasi Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing, Claremont, CA: 25-minute talk entitled: Testing Parallel Random Number Generators, presented by joint author A. Srinivasan.  (July, 1998)
  46. SIAM 1997 Annual Meeting, Stanford, CA; 15-minute talk entitled: A Non-linear Fibonacci Pseudorandom Number Generator.  (July, 1997)
  47. Seventh SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, San Francisco, CA; 20-minute talk entitled: An Analysis of the Parallel Computation of Arbitrarily Branched Cable Neuron Models.  (March, 1995)
  48. Seventh SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, San Francisco, CA; 20-minute talk entitled: Techniques for Testing the Quality of Parallel Pseudorandom Number Generators, presented by joint author S. Cuccaro.  (March, 1995)
  49. Supercomputing '94, Washington, D.C.: 30-minute talk entitled: Implementation and Usage of a Portable and Reproducible Parallel Pseudorandom Number Generators, presented by joint author D. Pryor.  (November, 1994)
  50. SIAM 1994 Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA; 15-minute talk entitled: Two Domain Decompositions Yield an Effective Vector/Parallel Algorithm for Nerve Equations on Branching One-Dimensional Domains.  (August, 1994)
  51. Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing, University of Nevada, Las Vegas: 20-minute talk entitled: A Fast, High Quality, and Reproducible Parallel Lagged-Fibonacci Pseudorandom Number Generator.  (June, 1994)
  52. Sixth SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, Norfolk, VA; 30-minute talk entitled: Recent Developments in Parallel Pseudorandom Number Generation.  (March, 1993)
  53. 1992 Gordon Research Conference on "Software Tools and Libraries for Concurrent Supercomputing'', Plymouth, NH; poster entitled: A Deterministic and Reproducible Lagged-Fibonacci Pseudorandom Number Generator.  (July, 1992)
  54. SIAM 1992 Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, CA; contributed talk entitled: A Gradient Random Walk Method for Two-Dimensional Reaction-Diffusion Equations.  (June, 1992)
  55. NSF/CBMS Regional Research Conference on Multigrid and Multilevel Adaptive Methods for Partial Differential Equations, Washington, D.C.; talk entitled: Towards Monte Carlo Multigrid Methods.  (May, 1992)
  56. UMIACS Workshop on Massively Parallel Computing, University of Maryland, College Park, MD: talk entitled: Monte Carlo Multigrid Methods.  (April, 1992)
  57. Fourth SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, Chicago, IL: poster entitled: A New Monte Carlo Algorithm for Solving Elliptic Problems on Massively Parallel Computers.  (December, 1991)
  58. Sixth Parallel Circus, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, NYU, New York, NY: talk entitled: Parallel Wiener Integral Methods for Elliptic Boundary Value Problems.  (March, 1988)
  59. Society for Neuroscience 1987 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA: poster entitled: Computer Studies of Negative Feedback in the Nervous System.  (September, 1987)

Tutorials:

  1. Research and Development Center for Data Assimilation, Institute for Statistical Mathematics, Tachikawa, Tokyo, Japan: Five hours of lectures Monte Carlo methods in a short course on Brownian Motion and Partial Differential Equations. (December, 2016)
  2. The 2016 Conference on High-Performance Computing and Simulation (HPCS2014), Hilton Hotel, Innsbruck, Austria: Six-hour tutorial entitled Monte Carlo Methods and High-Performance. (July, 2016)
  3. Beijing Computational Science Research Center (CSRC), Beijing, People's Republic of China, Organized a summer short course on Monte Carlo Methods, and gave four hours of lectures. (July, 2016)
  4. Supercomputing Frontiers 2015, A*STAR Computational Resource Centre, Singapore: Four hour tutorial entitled Monte Carlo Methods and High-Performance. (March, 2015)
  5. The 2014 Conference on High-Performance Computing and Simulation (HPCS2014), Savoia Hotel Regency, Bologna, Italy: Three hour tutorial entitled Monte Carlo Methods and High-Performance. (July, 2014)
  6. Institute of Computational Mathematics, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China: Six hours of lectures on Monte Carlo methods and high-performance computing in a short-course entitled High-Performance Monte Carlo with Emphasis on Partial Differential Equations. (April, 2013)
  7. Research and Development Center for Data Assimilation, Institute for Statistical Mathematics, Tachikawa, Tokyo, Japan: Five hours of lectures Monte Carlo methods in a short course on Monte Carlo Methods for Partial Differential Equations. (February, 2013)
  8. Supercomputing Center of the Computer Network Information Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China: Twelve hours of lectures Monte Carlo methods and random number generation in the Computer Network Information Center (CNIC) Summer School: Monte Carlo Methods and High-Performance Computing. (May, 2012)
  9. Soongsil University, Seoul, Korea: Twelve hours of lectures on Monte Carlo methods and random number generation in the National Institute of Mathematical Sciences (NIMS) Summer School: Stochastic/Multiscale Methods and Applications. (June, 2010)
  10. The Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Tokyo, Japan: Three hour tutorial entitled The Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators (SPRNG) Library: A Tutorial. (January, 2008)
  11. San Diego Supercomputing Center Summer Parallel Computing Institute, University of California, San Diego, CA: Two hour tutorial entitled Random, Pseudorandom, and Quasirandom Numbers and Their Generation in Serial and Parallel.  (August, 2000)
  12. NATO Advanced Study Institute: Quantum Monte Carlo Methods in Physics and Chemistry, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY: Two day tutorial on the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators Library.  (June, 1998)
  13. Distributed Memory Computer Conference 6, Portland, OR; half-day tutorial entitled Monte Carlo for Partial Differential Equations: Highly Parallel Methods Based on Statistical Sampling.  (April, 1991)
  14. Supercomputing '90: New York, NY: A full-day tutorial entitled Monte Carlo for Partial Differential Equations: Highly Parallel Methods Based on Statistical Sampling.  (November, 1990)

Research Grants:

  1. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, Information Technology Office, Building The Future award for Standardizing Computational Reproducibility, to Dr. Michael Mascagni, January 1, 2015 to September 30, 2015 at NIST, $123000 support for a post-doctoral researcher and a workshop on numerical reproducibility.
  2. Intel Corporation, donation of a dual processor, 16-core (32 cores total) Xeon Ivy Bridge computer with 64GB of memory and with the Intel MIC (Phi) card to Dr. Michael Mascagni, July 1, 2013 worth $15000.
  3. Nvidia Corporation, donation of a Tesla K20 GPGPU to Dr. Michael Mascagni, April 15, 2013 worth $3000.
  4. U. S. Department of Education, Graduate Assistantships in Areas of National Need (GAANN) entitled Computer Science GAANN Fellowships for Florida State University, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $400,000 for three years beginning September 1, 2012 at Florida State University.  Person months committed: Calendar Year: 1.0, Academic Year: 0.5, Summer Period: 0.5, no summer support.
  5. Intel Corporation, donation of a Ivy Bridge computer to Dr. Michael Mascagni, July 1, 2012 worth $2000.
  6. U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Small Business Innovation Research and Technology Transfer (SBIR) Phase I proposal entitled High-Quality Random Number Generation Software for High-Performance Computing, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator for a subcontract from prime contractor, Daniel H. Wagner Associates, Inc., $34,420.00 for six months beginning 1 March, 2012 at Florida State University. Person months committed: Calendar Year: 1.0, Academic Year: 0.5, Summer Period: 0.5, 1..0 month summer support.
  7. LittleFe Project, Earlham College, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator for a LittleFe computer with 12 cores and 6 GPGPUs worth $5000.
  8. Bulgarian National Science Fund, collaborative grant to cooperate with the Department of Grid Technologies and Applications, Institute for Parallel Processing, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Grant #DO02-146 entitled Advanced Quasi-Monte Carlo Grid Computing - Framework, Libraries, Pilot Grid Applications, Michael Mascagni, Florida State University Contact, beginning January 2008 at the Florida State University.
  9. Japan Society for Promotion of Science (JSPS) Core-to-Core Program, collaborative grant to cooperate in a multi-national research effort headed at the University of Hiroshima's Department of Mathematics and entitled New Developments of Arithmetic Geometry, Motive, Galois Theory, and Their Practical Applications, Michael Mascagni, Florida State University Contact, beginning January 2008 at the Florida State University.
  10. NATO Scientific Directorate, a Collaborative Linkage Grant to link groups from FSU, the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Berlin's Weierstrass Institute for Applied Analysis and Stochastics, the Bulgarian, Rumanian and Turkmenian Academy of Sciences, entitled Numerical Prediction of the Dispersal of Contaminants in the Atmosphere and Ground, Michael Mascagni, NATO Country Coordinator, $28,000 travel support for 24 months beginning July 2005 at the Florida State University.
  11. Department of Defense, Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP) grant entitled A Laboratory for Distributed and Grid Computing, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $200,000 for equipment, one year beginning September, 2003.
  12. NATO Scientific Directorate, a Collaborative Linkage Grant to link groups from FSU, The Free University of Brussels, the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Berlin's Weierstrass Institute for Applied Analysis and Stochastics, and the Turkmenian Academy of Sciences, entitled Stochastic and Computational Models of Transport in Porous Media, Michael Mascagni, NATO Country Coordinator, $25,000 travel support for 36 months beginning July 2002 at the Florida State University.
  13. NSF International Programs, a grant entitled Cooperative Research with Austria with Dr. Peter Hellekalek's Random Number Generation (pLab) Group at the University of Salzburg, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $24,000 for four years, beginning September, 1999 at the Florida State University.
  14. NSF-NATO Postdoctoral Fellowship for Dr. Aneta Karaivanova of the Central Laboratory for Parallel Processing, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Michael Mascagni, host and sponsor, $44,400 for one year beginning September, 1999 at the Florida State University.
  15. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences Grant entitled The Impact of Random Numbers on Parallel Monte Carlo Applications, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $150,000 for three years beginning February, 1999 at the University of Southern Mississippi.
  16. Mississippi NASA Space Grant: University of Southern Mississippi Subcontract, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $37,250 per year for 1997-1999 at the University of Southern Mississippi.
  17. Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Program for Italian and Foreign Research Institutions: Short-term Mobility Fellowships; Michael Mascagni with sponsorship of Renato Spigler, Dipartimento di Matematica, Unversità di Lecce, Italy.  Travel expenses, lodging expenses, and Lit. 2,400,000, March, 1994.

Research Contracts:

  1. Army Research Office, Mathematical and Computer Sciences Division, Computational Mathematics proposal entitled Scrambled Quasirandom Numbers and Applications, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $80,000, support for 2.5 years beginning October 1, 2006 at the Florida State University.
  2. Army Research Office, Mathematical and Computer Sciences Division,  proposal entitled Support for the Fifth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $10,000 travel support for the Fifth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, May 16-20, 2005, at the Florida State University.
  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/University of California, Research Contract entitled Support for the Fifth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $10,000 support for 1 year beginning April 1, 2005 at Florida State University.
  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory/University of California, Research Contract entitled Improved Methods for Random Number Generation, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $70,000 support for 1 year beginning October 1, 2003 at Florida State University.
  5. Army Research Office, Mathematical and Computer Sciences Division, Computational Mathematics contract entitled Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods for Markov Chain Problems, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $249,000, support for 3 years beginning September 1, 2001.
  6. ASCI Level III Contract to Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Sandia National Laboratories entitled Random Number for ASCI Monte Carlo Applications, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $494,921 for four years beginning October 1, 1999 at the Florida State University.
  7. Army Research Office, Mathematical and Computer Sciences Division, Computational Mathematics Grant entitled Quasirandom Numbers for Parallel and Distributed Applications, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $487,085 for three years beginning March 1, 1999 at the University of Southern Mississippi with a $195,417 subcontract to the Florida State University.
  8. DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Office through Northrop Grumman Data Systems, entitled Northrop Grumman High Performance Computing Programming Environment and Training; Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $100,000 per year for 1997-1999 at the University of Southern Mississippi.
  9. DARPA Contract Number DABT63-95-C-0123 for ITO: Scalable Systems and Software, entitled A Scalable Pseudorandom Number Generation Library for Parallel Monte Carlo Computations; Michael Mascagni and David Ceperley (Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications), Principal Investigators, $607,106 for three years beginning March 1, 1995 at the University of Illinois.

Declined Research Proposals:

  1. FSU GAP proposal entitled Reproducible Random Number Generation Using Unpredictable Random Numbers, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $40,000.00 for 12 months.Person months committed: Calendar Year: 0.0, Academic Year: 0.0, Summer Period: 0.0, 0.0 month summer support.
  2. National Science Foundation (NSF), Small Business Technolgy Transfer (STTR) proposal entitled Accelerating Monte Carlo-Based Continuum Electrostatics In Structural Biology, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator for a subcontract from prime contractor, Daniel H. Wagner Associates, Inc., $75,000.00 for 12 months beginning 1 June, 2013 at Florida State University. Person months committed: Calendar Year: 2.0, Academic Year: 0.0, Summer Period: 2.0, 2.0 month summer support.
  3. U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Small Business Innovation Research and Technology Transfer (SBIR) Phase II proposal entitled Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators for Multiple Architectures, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator for a subcontract from prime contractor, Daniel H. Wagner Associates, Inc., $292,030.00 for 24 months beginning 1 January, 2013 at Florida State University. Person months committed: Calendar Year: 3.5, Academic Year: 0.5, Summer Period: 3.0, 3.0 month summer support.
  4. U. S. Department of Defense, Small Business Technolgy Transfer (STTR) proposal entitled High-Quality Random Number Generation Software for Modern High-Performance Computing Architectures, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator for a subcontract from prime contractor, Daniel H. Wagner Associates, Inc., $50,000 for six months begining 1 October, 2010 at Florida State University.  Person months committed: Calendar Year: 1.0, Academic Year: 0.5, Summer Period: 0.5, no summer support.
  5. U. S. Department of Education, Graduate Assistantships in Areas of National Need (GAANN) entitled Computer Science GAANN Fellowships for Florida State University, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $1,647,487 for three years beginning September 1, 2010 at Florida State University.  Person months committed: Calendar Year: 1.0, Academic Year: 0.5, Summer Period: 0.5, no summer support.
  6. National Institutes of Health, National Institute of General Medical Sciences proposal entitled Computational Biomolecular Electrostatics: Stochastic Algorithms and Applications, Michael Mascagni and Marcia Fenley, Principal Investigators, $1,265,370 support for 4 years beginning April 1, 2008 at the Florida State University.  Person months committed: Calendar Year: 3.0, Academic Year: 1.0, Summer Period: 2.0, two months summer support.
  7. U. S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation, proposal entitled Stochastic Computational Methods for Solving Boundary-Value Problems in Biomolecular Chemical Physics Applications, Michael Mascagni, U. S. Team Leader, $68,400 ($11,400 local), support for 24 months beginning October 1, 2006 at the Florida State University.
  8. U. S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation, proposal entitled Stochastic Computational Methods for Solving Boundary Value Problems in Biomolecular Chemistry Applications, Michael Mascagni, U. S. Team Leader, $59,550 ($11,110 local), support for 19 months beginning February 1, 2005 at the Florida State University.
  9. NSF/CISE Information Technology Research (ITR) Program proposal entitled Development of a Multi-Purpose Tera to Peta Scale Collaborative Computing Facility, Michael Mascagni, Co-Principal Investigator, $2,370,000 support for 5 years beginning October 1, 2004 at the Florida State University.
  10. NIH, NIH Small Grant Program proposal entitled Accelerated Rosetta, Michael Mascagni, Co-Principal Investigator, $50,000 support for 12 months beginning on January 1, 2005, at North Carolina A&T University.
  11. NSF/CISE, CISE Research Infrastructure Program proposal entitled Equipment for a Networking Environment Supporting Security in the Extreme,  Michael Mascagni, Senior Personnel, $1,004,737 support for 60 months beginning June 1, 2004.
  12. NSF Major Research Instrumentation Program entitled Development of a Multi-purpose Tera to Peta Scale Computational Facility at FSU, Michael Mascagni, Senior Personnel,  $1,540,000 support for 24 months beginning September 1, 2003.
  13. Collaboration in Basic Science and Engineering Grant from the National Research Council for collaboration with the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences entitled Deterministic Construction of Markov Chains for Enhanced Convergence: Application to Integral Equations and Their Complexity, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $8,200 travel support for 12 months.
  14. NSF/CISE Research Resources grant entitled Heterogeneous Distributed-Computing Test-Bed for Stochastic Computations, Ashok Srinivasan and Michael Mascagni Co-Principal Investigators, $148,320 for equipment.
  15. NSF Information Technology Research, a grant entitled Quasirandom Number Generation Software, Michael Mascagni, Principal Investigator, $496,751 support for 36 months.
  16. NSF Engineering Directorate, a grant entitled Advanced Algorithms and Visualization for Computational Design and Analysis of Transport Properties of Two-phase Materials, Michael Mascagni, Co-Principal Investigator, $149,480 support for 18 months.

Teaching and Training

Courses Taught:

  1. CIS 6980: Ph.D. Dissertation, Spring 2015, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate student, 9 credits.
  2. CIS 6900: Computational Resilience, Spring 2015, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  3. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Exam, Fall 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 4 graduate students, 0 credits.
  4. CIS 6980: Ph.D. Dissertation, Fall 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate student, 9 credits.
  5. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Exam, Summer 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 0 credits.
  6. CIS 6980: Ph.D. Dissertation, Spring 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  7. CIS 5900: Random Number Generation, Summer 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  8. CIS 5900: Random Number Generation, Summer 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  9. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Exam, Spring 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 4 graduate students, 0 credits.
  10. CIS 6980: Ph.D. Dissertation, Spring 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  11. CIS 5900: Random Number Generation, Spring 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  12. CIS 5900: Generating Numbers Randomly, Spring 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  13. CIS 5900: Random Number Theory, Spring 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  14. CIS 5900: HPC Using Monte Carlo, Spring 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  15. CIS 5900: Computational Resilience, Spring 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 12 credits.
  16. CIS 5900: Random Number Generation, Spring 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  17. COT 5507: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Spring 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 25 graduate students, 3 credits.
  18. COT 5715: Random Number Generation, Spring 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 25 graduate students, 3 credits.
  19. COT 4420: Theory of Computation, Spring 2014, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 31 distance undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  20. CIS 8985: Doctoral Dissertation Defense, Fall 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 0 credits.
  21. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Exam, Fall 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 5 graduate students, 0 credits.
  22. CIS 6980: Ph.D. Dissertation, Fall 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  23. CIS 5900: Random Number Generation, Fall 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 3 graduate students, 3 credits.
  24. COP 4342: Unix Tools, Fall 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 27 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  25. CIS 5900: Computer Science IV, Fall 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  26. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Fall 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 6 credit.
  27. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Exam, Summer 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 5 graduate students, 0 credits.
  28. CIS 6980: Ph.D. Dissertation, Summer 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  29. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Summer 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 6 credit.
  30. COT 5507: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Summer 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 5 graduate students, 3 credits.
  31. CIS 5900: Monte Carlo and High-Performance Computing, Summer 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  32. WEP088: Monte Carlo Methods and High-Performance Computing, Winter Enrichment Program 2013, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, 40 graduate students, 6 credits.
  33. CIS 8976: Masters Thesis Defense, Spring 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 0 credits.
  34. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Exam, Spring 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 22 graduate students, 0 credits.
  35. CIS 6980: Ph.D. Dissertation, Spring 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate student, 9+9 credits.
  36. CIS 6900: High Throughput Monte Carlo, Spring 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  37. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Spring 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 6 credits.
  38. CAP 5932: Monte Carlo Methods, Spring 2013, Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  39. CIS 5930: Monte Carlo Methods, Spring 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 15 graduate students, 3 credits.
  40. CIS 5900: Grid-Based Monte Carlo Methods, Spring 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  41. CGS 5429: Introduction to Computer Theory, Spring 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 distance graduate student, 3 credits.
  42. ISC 5228: Monte Carlo Methods, Spring 2013, Florida State University, Department of Scientific Computing, 3 graduate students, 3 credits.
  43. COT 4420: Theory of Computation, Spring 2013, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 27 distance undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  44. CIS 8976: Masters Thesis Defense, Fall 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 0 credits.
  45. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Exam, Fall 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 5 graduate students, 0 credits.
  46. CIS 6980: Ph.D. Dissertation, Fall 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate student2, 9+9 credits.
  47. CIS 6900: High Throughput Monte Carlo, Fall 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  48. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Fall 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 3 graduate students, 9+6+6 credits.
  49. COT 5507: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Fall 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 21 graduate students, 3 credits.
  50. CGS 5427: Algorithm Design and Analysis, Fall 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 4 graduate students, 3 credits.
  51. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Fall 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 43 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  52. CIS 6980: Ph.D. Dissertation, Summer 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 9+9 credits.
  53. CIS 6900: Random Number Research, Summer 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 1 credit.
  54. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Summer 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 6+3 credits.
  55. CIS 5930: Parallel and Distributed Monte Carlo Methods, Summer 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 14 graduate students, 3 credits.
  56. CIS 5900: Special Topics in Monte Carlo Methods, Summer 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  57. CIS 4930: Parallel and Distributed Monte Carlo Methods, Summer 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate student, 3 credits.
  58. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Exam, Spring 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 0 credits.
  59. CIS 6980: Ph.D. Dissertation, Spring 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 9+9 credits.
  60. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Spring 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 6+3 credits.
  61. CIS 5900: Hardware Random Number Generation, Spring 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  62. CIS 5900: Monte Carlo Linear Algebra, Spring 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  63. COT 5507: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Spring 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 19 graduate students, 3 credits.
  64. COT 5715: Random Number Generation, Spring 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 8 graduate students, 3 credits.
  65. CGS 5429: Introduction to Computer Theory, Spring 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 3 distance graduate students, 3 credits.
  66. COT 4420: Theory of Computation, Spring 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 26 distance undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  67. CIS 4930: Quantum Computing, Spring 2012, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate student, 3 credits.
  68. CIS 8976: Masters Thesis Defense, Fall 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 0 credits.
  69. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Exam, Fall 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 6 graduate students, 0 credits.
  70. CIS 6980: Ph.D. Dissertation, Fall 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  71. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Fall 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate student, 9+6 credits.
  72. CIS 5900: Monte Carlo Methods, Fall 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  73. CIS 5900: Uncertainty and Randomness, Fall 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  74. CIS 5900: Database Research, Fall 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 6 credits.
  75. CGS 5427: Algorithm Design and Analysis, Fall 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 11 graduate students, 3 credits.
  76. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Fall 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 33 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  77. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Exam, Summer 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 0 credits.
  78. CIS 8964: Ph.D. Preliminary Exam, Summer 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 0 credits.
  79. CIS 6980: Ph.D. Dissertation, Summer 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  80. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Summer 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate student, 9+2 credits.
  81. ISC 5228/CIS 5930: Monte Carlo Methods, Summer 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 16 graduate student, 3 credits.
  82. CIS 5900: Monte Carlo Methods, Summer 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 6 credits.
  83. CIS 5900: Random Methods, Summer 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  84. CIS 4930: Monte Carlo Methods, Summer 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 3 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  85. CIS 5900: Random Number Applications, Spring 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 6 credits.
  86. CIS 8974: Masters Project Defense, Spring 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate students, 0 credits.
  87. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive, Spring 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 0 credits.
  88. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Spring 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate student, 3 credits per student.
  89. CIS 5900: Leaping Random Numbers, Spring 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  90. COT 5507: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Spring 2011, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 14 graduate students,  3 credits.
  91. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Exam, Fall 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate students, 0 credits.
  92. CIS 6900: Algorithms Research, Fall 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  93. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Fall 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate student, 3 credits per student.
  94. CIS 5900: Random Number Research, Fall 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  95. CIS 5900: Generating Random Numbers, Fall 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  96. CGS 5427: Algorithm Design and Analysis, Fall 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 6 graduate students, 3 credits.
  97. CIS 5371: Cryptography, Fall 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 23 graduate students, 3 credits.
  98. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Fall 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 30 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  99. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive, Summer 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 0 credits.
  100. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Summer 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  101. CIS 5900: Random Numbers, Summer 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  102. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive, Spring 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 8 graduate students, 0 credits.
  103. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Spring 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  104. CIS 5900: Random Numbers, Spring 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  105. COT 5507: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Spring 2010, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 9 graduate students,  3 credits.
  106. MAT 8985: Dissertation Defense, Spring 2010, Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, 1 graduate student, 0 credits.
  107. MAT 6980: Dissertation, Spring 2010, Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  108. WE246: Random Number Generation, Winter Enrichment Program 2010, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, 50 graduate students, 0 credits.
  109. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Exam, Fall 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate students, 0 credits.
  110. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Fall 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  111. COT 5715: Random Number Generation, Fall 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 14 graduate students, 3 credits.
  112. CIS 5930: Random Number Generation (DIS), Fall 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  113. CIS 5900: Random Number Techniques, Fall 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  114. CIS 5900: Computer Science Infrastructure, Fall 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  115. CGS 5427: Algorithm Design and Analysis, Fall 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 3 graduate students, 3 credits.
  116. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Fall 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 13 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  117. CIS 5930: Monte Carlo Methods, Summer Session B 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 6 graduate students, 3 credits.
  118. MAP 5932: Monte Carlo Methods, Summer Session B 2009, Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, 8 graduate students, 3 credits.
  119. CIS 3943: Computer Science Internship I, Summer Session A 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  120. CIS 8976: Masters Thesis Defense, Spring 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate students, 0 credits.
  121. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Spring 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  122. CIS 5900: Design of Algorithms, Spring 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  123. COT 5507: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Spring 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 17 graduate students,  3 credits.
  124. CGS 5427: Algorithm Design and Analysis, Spring 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 5 graduate students, 3 credits.
  125. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Spring 2009, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 23 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  126. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Fall 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  127. CIS 5900: Category Theory, Fall 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  128. CIS 5900: Computational Methods, Fall 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  129. CIS 5900: Programming Structure, Fall 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 1 credit.
  130. CGS 5429: Introduction to Computer Theory, Fall 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 12 graduate students, 3 credits.
  131. COT 4420: Theory of Computation, Fall 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 20 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  132. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Summer 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  133. CIS 5930: Random Number Generation, Summer 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 6 graduate students, 3 credits.
  134. CIS 5915: Graduate Software Project, Summer 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  135. MAD 5932: Random Number Generation, Summer 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 3 credits.
  136. CIS 4930: Random Number Generation, Summer 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate student, 3 credits.
  137. CIS 6900: Geometrical Problems in Monte Carlo, Spring 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  138. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Spring 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  139. CIS 5915: Graduate Software Project, Spring 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  140. COT 5507: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Spring 2008, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 21 graduate students,  3 credits.
  141. CIS 8974: MS Projects Defense, Fall 2007, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 0 credits.
  142. CIS 5915: Graduate Software Project, Fall 2007, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  143. MAD 5932: Monte Carlo Methods, Fall 2007, Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, 9 graduate students, 3 credits.
  144. CIS 5930: Monte Carlo Methods, Fall 2007, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 6 graduate students, 3 credits.
  145. CGS 5429: Introduction to Computer Theory, Fall 2007, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 10 graduate students, 3 credits.
  146. COT 4420: Theory of Computation, Fall 2007, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 26 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  147. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Spring 2007, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  148. CIS 5900: Biochemical Monte Carlo Methods (Directed Individual Study), Spring 2007, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  149. COT 5507: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Spring 2007, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 20 graduate students,  3 credits.
  150. CGS 5429: Introduction to Computer Theory, Spring 2007, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 3 credits.
  151. COT 4420: Theory of Computation, Spring 2007, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 35 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  152. CIS 8976: Masters Thesis Defense, Fall 2006, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate students, 0 credits.
  153. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Fall 2006, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 2 credits.
  154. CGS 5427: Algorithm Design and Analysis, Fall 2006, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 4 graduate students, 3 credits.
  155. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Fall 2006, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 12 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  156. Doctoral Examination, Sommersemester 2006, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Departments of Mathematics and Mechanical Engineering, 1 graduate student.
  157. 401-3470-00 G: Advanced Monte Carlo Methods II, Sommersemester 2006, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Department of Mathematics, Seminar for Applied Mathematics, 12 graduate students, 3 credits.
  158. 401-3469-00 G: Advanced Monte Carlo Methods I, Wintersemester 2005-6, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Department of Mathematics, Seminar for Applied Mathematics, 12 graduate students, 3 credits.
  159. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Spring 2006, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 2 credits.
  160. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Fall 2005, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 2 credits.
  161. CIS 5900: Monte Carlo Methods for Partial Differential Equations, Summer 2005, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 2 credits.
  162. COT 5507: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Summer 2005, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 8 graduate students,  3 credits.
  163. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Summer 2005, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 2 credits.
  164. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Spring 2005, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 41 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  165. CGS 5427: Algorithm Design and Analysis, Spring 2004, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 3 graduate students, 3 credits.
  166. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Spring 2005, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 3 credits.
  167. CIS 4933: Honors Work, Fall 2004, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate student, 3 credits.
  168. COT 5507: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Fall 2004, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 16 graduate students, 2 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  169. CIS 4933: Honors Work, Summer 2004, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate student, 3 credits.
  170. CIS 5900: Monte Carlo Methods in Computer Science, Summer 2004, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 4 credits.
  171. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Spring 2004, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 5/3 credits.
  172. CIS 6980: Doctoral Dissertation, Spring 2004, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate students, 2 credits.
  173. CIS 8976: Masters Thesis Defense, Spring 2004, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 0 credits.
  174. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Spring 2004, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 74 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  175. CGS 5427: Algorithm Design and Analysis, Spring 2004, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 3 credits.
  176. CIS 6980: Doctoral Dissertation, Spring 2004, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  177. CIS 8985: Doctoral Dissertation Defense, Spring 2004, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 0 credits.
  178. CIS 5930: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Fall 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 5 graduate students, 3 credits.
  179. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Fall 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 3/2 credits.
  180. CIS 6980: Doctoral Dissertation, Fall 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  181. CIS 8976: Masters Thesis Defense, Fall 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 0 credits.
  182. CIS 8985: Doctoral Dissertation Defense, Summer 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 0 credits.
  183. CIS 6980: Doctoral Dissertation, Summer 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 9/1 credits.
  184. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Summer 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  185. MAT 6908: Particle Methods, Summer 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 5 credits.
  186. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Spring 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 68 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  187. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Spring 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 9 distance undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  188. CGS 5427: Algorithm Design and Analysis, Spring 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 4 graduate students, 3 credits.
  189. CIS 5940: Supervised Teaching, Spring 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 3 credits.
  190. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Spring 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 6/1 credits.
  191. CIS 6900: Scrambled Quasirandom Number Generation, Spring 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 9 credits.
  192. CIS 6980: Doctoral Dissertation, Spring 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 6 credits.
  193. CIS 8976: Masters Thesis Defense, Spring 2003, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students, 0 credits.
  194. Concentrated Special Topics Course (14 hours in one week): Monte Carlo Methods for Partial Differential and Integral Equations, Universität Kaiserslautern, Institut für Techno- und Wirtschaftsmathematik (ITWM), Kaiserslautern, Germany, 20 graduate students.
  195. CIS 5930: Analytic Methods for Computer Science, Fall 2002, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 10 graduate students, 3 credits.
  196. CIS 6900: Scrambled Quasirandom Number Generation, Fall 2002, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 8 credits.
  197. CIS 6980: Doctoral Dissertation, Fall 2002, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student, 6 credits.
  198. 880500: Concrete Mathematics (Numerische Mathematik), Sommersemester 2002, Universität Salzburg, Institut für Scientific Computing, Salzburg, Austria, 6 undergraduate students.
  199. 880417: Special Topics in Scientific Computing-Monte-Carlo Methods for Applied Computer Science (Ausgewählte Kapitel aus Scientific Computing), Sommersemester 2002, Universität Salzburg, Institut für Scientific Computing, Salzburg, Austria, 3 graduate students.
  200. CIS 4900: Research in Random Numbers, Spring 2002, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate student.
  201. CIS 4933: Honors Work, Spring 2002, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate student.
  202. CIS 5900: Particle Methods, Spring 2002, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  203. CIS 5970: Masters Thesis, Spring 2002, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  204. CIS 6900: Scrambled Quasirandom Number Generation, Spring 2002, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  205. CIS 6980: Doctoral Dissertation, Spring 2002, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  206. CIS 8976: Masters Thesis Defense, Spring 2002, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  207. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Fall 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 5 undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  208. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Fall 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 5 distance undergraduate students, 3 credits.
  209. CGS 5427: Algorithm Design and Analysis, Fall 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 10 graduate students 3 credits..
  210. CIS 5900: Random Techniques in Computer Science, Fall 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 4 graduate students.
  211. CIS 5970: Thesis, Fall 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  212. CIS 6900: Scrambling Quasirandom Numbers, Fall 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  213. CIS 6900: Random Techniques in Computer Science, Fall 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  214. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Examination, Summer 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  215. CIS 6980: Doctoral Dissertation, Summer 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  216. CIS 6900: Random Number Research, Summer 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 3 graduate students.
  217. CIS 5970: Masters These, Summer 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  218. CIS 5915: Graduate Software Project, Summer 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  219. CIS 5900: Research In Random Numbers, Summer I 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  220. CIS 5915: Graduate Software Project, Summer I 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  221. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Spring 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 48 undergraduate students.
  222. COP 4531: Complexity and Analysis of Algorithms and Data Structures, Spring 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 10 distance undergraduate students.
  223. CGS 5427: Algorithm Design and Analysis, Spring 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 7 graduate students.
  224. CIS 4900: Research In Random Numbers, Spring 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate student.
  225. CIS 4933: Honors Work, Spring 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate student.
  226. CIS 5900: Research In Random Numbers, Spring 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 4 graduate students.
  227. CIS 5915: Graduate Software Project, Spring 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students.
  228. CIS 6900: SETI@home Research, Spring 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  229. CIS 8964: Preliminary Doctoral Examination, Spring 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  230. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Examination, Spring 2001, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  231. CIS 4933: Honors Work, Fall 2000, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate student.
  232. CIS 5915: Graduate Software Research, Fall 2000, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  233. CIS 5970: Thesis, CIS 4933: Honors Work, Fall 2000, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  234. CIS 5915: Graduate Software Research, Summer 2000, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  235. CIS 5970: Thesis, Summer 2000, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students.
  236. CIS 6900: Computing Set Uniformity, Summer 2000, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  237. CIS 8966: Masters Comprehensive Examination, Summer 2000, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  238. CIS 8976: Masters Thesis Defense, Summer 2000, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  239. CIS 4900: Analysis of Algorithms, Fall 2000, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate student.
  240. CIS 5910: Supervised Research, Fall 2000, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  241. CIS 5915: Graduate Software Project, Fall 2000, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  242. CIS 6900: Monte Carlo and Financial Computing Research, Fall 2000, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 graduate student.
  243. CGS 5427: Algorithm Design and Analysis, Fall, 1999, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 20 graduate students.
  244. COP 4530: Analysis of Algorithms, Fall, 1999, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 72 undergraduate students.
  245. CIS 4900: Random Number Research, Fall, 1999, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1 undergraduate student.
  246. CIS 5910: Supervised Research, Fall, 1999, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2 graduate students.
  247. SC 781: Special Topics in Monte Carlo Methods, Spring 1998, University of Southern Mississippi, Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing: 8 graduate students.
  248. MAT 167: Calculus I with Analytical Geometry: Spring 1997, University of Southern Mississippi, Department of Mathematics, 32 undergraduate students.
  249. COSC 173: Discrete Structures: Fall 1994, Georgetown University, Department of Computer Science, 25 undergraduate students.
  250. Methods in Computational Neuroscience: Summer 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992: Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, 30 graduate students and postdoctoral associates per year.
  251. V22.0421: Introduction to Numerical Analysis: Spring 1986, Spring 1987, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, Department of Computer Science, total of 53 undergraduate students.

Graduate Student Committee Memberships:

  1. Sharanya Jayaraman, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Doctoral Committee Chair (Current), dissertation title TBD.
  2. Asia Aljahdali, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Doctoral Committee Chair (Current), dissertation title TBD.
  3. Manal Bayousef, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Doctoral Committee Chair (Current), dissertation title TBD.
  4. John Thrasher, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Doctoral Committee Chair (Current), dissertation title TBD.
  5. Preston Hamilton, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Thesis Chair, December 2016, thesis title There & Never Back Again: A Walk-on-Subdomains Tale.
  6. Steven Røhr, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Committee Chair, December 2016, project title Phoenix: A Checkpointing Tool.
  7. Joshua Beizer, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Committee Chair, August 2016, project title Phoenix: Speeding up TestU01 with the Use of HTCONDOR.
  8. Christopher Ogden, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Doctoral Committee Chair, August 2016, dissertation title Soft Error Event Monte Carlo Modeling and Simulation: Impacts of Soft Error Events on Computer Memory.
  9. Patrick Fletcher, Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Doctoral Committee Member, August 2015, dissertation title Theoretical, Computational, and Experimental Topics in Anterior Pituitary Cell Signalling.
  10. James McClain, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Doctoral Committee Member April 2014, dissertation entitled: On Exactitude in Geographical Information Science.
  11. Yue Qiu, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Doctoral Committee Chair, December 2013, dissertation title: Parallel Random Number Generation.
  12. Travis Mackoy, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Doctoral Committee Member (Current), dissertation title TBD.
  13. Stefan Pauli, Departement Informatik (D-INF), Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich, Switzerland, Doctoral Committee Member, December 2014, dissertation title: Fault Tolerance in Multilevel Monte Carlo Methods.
  14. Jonathan Passerat-Palmbach, Engineering Doctoral School, Blaise Pascal University, Clermont-Ferrand, France, Doctoral Committee Member, October 2013, dissertation title: Contributions to Parallel Stochastic Simulation: Application to a Hybrid Monte-Carlo Simulation.
  15. Jie Ji, City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center, Department of Computer Science, NY, NY, Doctoral Committee Member, September 2013, dissertation entitled: Ultrafast Pseudorandom Number Generation Using
    Pseudorandom Permutations and Mappings.
  16. Samidh Chatterjee, Department of Computer Science, Doctoral Committee Member, October 2012, dissertation entitled: Experimental Approaches to Computational Geometric and Statistical Machine Translation Problems.
  17. Robert Harris, Florida State University, Department of Physics, Doctoral Committee Member, May 2012, dissertation entitled: Comparing the Poisson-Boltzmann Equation to Alternative Electrostatic Theories and Improving Stochastic Techniques For Implicit Solvent Models.
  18. Yong-Woon Jung,  Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Doctoral Committee Chair, March 2010, dissertation entitled: A Computational Study of Ion Conductance in the KcsA K+Channel Using A Nernst-Planck Model With Explicit Resident Ions.
  19. Richard Cosgrove, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Committee Chair (Current), thesis title TBD.
  20. Rakesh Rajappa, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Committee Chair (Current), project title TBD.
  21. Liang Li, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Committee Chair, August 2012, thesis entitled Testing Several Types of Random Number Generators.
  22. F. Steven Brailsford, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Committee Chair, March 2010, thesis entitled: SPRNG Gets a Normal Number Generator.
  23. Haohai Yu, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Doctoral Committee Member, August 2011, dissertation entitled: Acceleration Methods for Bayesian Network Sampling.
  24. Alexander Silalahi, Florida State University, Department of Physics, Doctoral Committee Member, March 2011, dissertation entitled: A Novel Stochastic Poisson-Boltzmann Solver and Incorporation of Finite Ion Sizes.
  25. Cristina Russo, Florida State University, Molecular Biophysics Program, Doctoral Committee Member, August 2010, dissertation entitled: Salt-Dependence of Protein-DNA Binding: Insignts Into Protein Electrostatics and Redesign.
  26. Yuhua Zhu, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Doctoral Committee Member, April 2010, dissertation entitled Optimal Linear Features for Content Based Image Retrieval and Applications.
  27. Subhajit Datta, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Doctoral Committee Member, March 2009, dissertation entitled: Metrics and Techniques to Guide Software Development.
  28. Ali Tarhini, Université de Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, France, Laboratoire Jean Kuntzmann de Mathématique Appliquées et Informatique, June, 2008,  Doctoral Committee Member, dissertation entitled: Numerical Analysis of Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods and Applications to Coagulation Problems.
  29. Quoc M. Doan, Florida State University, Department of Physics, Doctoral Committee Member April 2007, dissertation entitled: Study of Nematic Phase of a Quantum Two-Dimensional Electron System.
  30. Alexei Bazavov, Florida State University, Department of Physics, Doctoral Committee Member, August 2007, dissertation entitled: The Deconfining Phase Transition in and off Equilibrium.
  31. Niraj Pandey, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Committee Chair August, 2008, Masters Committee Chair, project entitled: Implementation of Leap Ahead Functions for Linear Congruential and Lagged Fibonacci Generators.
  32. Jungyuan (Jane) Ren, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, December, 2006, Masters Committee Chair, thesis entitled: Design and Implementation of the Scalable Parallel Random Number Generators Library 4.0.
  33. Tim Pillards, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Catholic University of Leuven), Leuven, Belgium, Department of Computer Science, Faculty of Engineering, October, 2006,  Doctoral Committee Member, dissertation entitled: Quasi-Monte Carlo Integration Over a Simplex in the Entire Space.
  34. Goce Jakimoski, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, April, 2006, Doctoral Committee Member, dissertation entitled: Primitives and Schemes for Non-Atomics Information Authentication.
  35. Hongmei Chi, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, August 2004, Doctoral Committee Chair, dissertation entitled: Scrambled Quasirandom Sequences and Their Applications.
  36. Tri Le-Van, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, April 2004, Doctoral Committee Member, dissertation entitled: Information Hiding.
  37. Yaohang Li, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, August 2003, Doctoral Committee Chair, dissertation entitled: Grid-based Monte Carlo Applications.
  38. Han-Ku Lee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, August 2003, Doctoral Committee Member, dissertation entitled: Efficient Compilation of the HPJava Language for Parallel Computing.
  39. Thomas Asbury, Florida State University, Molecular Biophysics Program, Doctoral Committee Member, 2003-2005, dissertation entitled: Computational Methods in Atomic Structure Determination of Membrane Proteins.
  40. Vikram Aggarwal, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, August 2004, Masters Committee Member, thesis entitled: Stochastic Methods in Linear Algebra.
  41. Jason Parker,  Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, December 2003, Masters Committee Chair, thesis entitled: Extensions and Optimizations to the Scalable, Parallel Random Number Generators Library.
  42. Nikhil R. Bandodkar, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Committee Member.
  43. Wenchang Yan, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, December 2001, Masters Committee Chair, project entitled: An Online Random Number Testing Engine with CORBA.
  44. Prative Chend Balasubramanian,  Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, August 2001, Masters Committee Chair, project entitled: Inversive Congruential Generators for SPRNG.
  45. Yaohang Li, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, August 2000, Masters Committee Chair, thesis entitled: The Computational Measure of Uniformity.
  46. John Mayer, University of Southern Mississippi Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing, August 2000, Doctoral Committee Member.
  47. Hongbo (Mike) Zhou, University of Southern Mississippi Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing, December 2000 Doctoral Committee Chair, dissertation entitled, A Scientific Computing GUI Agent for Parallel Monte Carlo in a Distributed Environment.
  48. Chi-Ok Hwang, University of Southern Mississippi Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing, August 1999, Doctoral Committee Chair, dissertation entitled: New First Passage Algorithms with Applications to Permeability Calculations
  49. Alice Qiao, University of Southern Mississippi Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing, August 1999, Doctoral Committee Member, dissertation entitled: Modally Optimized Dynamic Explicit Nonlinear Finite Difference Scheme: MODEN FDS.
  50. Chen Qu, University of Southern Mississippi, Masters Program in Mathematics, December 1997, Masters Committee Chair: non-thesis degree.

Graduate Students Graduated:

  1. Preston Hamilton, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Thesis, December 2016.
  2. Steven Røhr, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Project, December 2016.
  3. Joshua Beizer, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Project, August 2016.
  4. Christopher Ogden, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Ph.D., August 2016.
  5. Yue Qiu, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Ph.D. December, 2013.
  6. Liang (Leo) Li, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Thesis, M.S. August 2012.
  7. Yong-Woon Jung,  Florida State University, Department of Mathematics, Ph.D. April, 2010.
  8. F. Steven Brailsford, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Thesis, M.S. April 2010.
  9. Niraj Pandey, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Project, M.S. August, 2008.
  10. Jungyuan (Jane) Ren, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Thesis, M.S. December 2006.
  11. Hongmei Chi, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Ph.D. August 2004.
  12. Jason Parker, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Thesis, M.S. December 2003.
  13. Yaohang Li, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Ph.D. August 2003.
  14. Wenchang Yan, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Project, M.S. December 2001.
  15. Prative Chend Balasubramanian, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Project, M.S. August 2001.
  16. Hongbo (Mike) Zhou, University of Southern Mississippi Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing, Ph.D., December 2000.
  17. Yaohang Li, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, Masters Thesis, M.S. August 2000.
  18. Chi-Ok Hwang, University of Southern Mississippi Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing, Ph.D. August 1999.

Undergraduate Research Students Supervised:

  1. Charles Mason, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2004-2005.
  2. Jane Ren, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2004-2005.
  3. Shyam Lakshmin, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1999-2001.
  4. Anna Suen, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2000-2001.
  5. Jason Parker, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1999-2000.

Undergraduate Honors Students Supervised:

  1. Jane Ren, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, graduated with Honors, December 2004.

Distance Learning Development Work:

I developed the distance learning version of COP 4531 for the Department of Computer Science and the Office of Distributed and Distance Learning at the Florida State University.  This course was taught in the new Computer Science curriculum by me in for the first time in Spring of 2001 to 10 distance students, and was offered again, by me, in Fall 2001.


Service

University Committees:

  1. Director of Graduate Admissions, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2015-present.
  2. Promotion and Tenure Representative to the College of Arts and Sciences, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2015-2016.
  3. Department of Computer Science Member, Faculty Senate, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2013-2015.
  4. Chair, OTI/ITS-Faculty Communication Committee, Faculty Senate, Florida State University, 2012-present.
  5. Director of Graduate Studies, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2008-2014.
  6. Member, Graduate Curriculum Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2008-present.
  7. SMALCS Departmental Representative, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2008-2014.
  8. Member Graduate Admissions and Financial Aid Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2004-present.
  9. Member, Executive Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2011-2013.
  10. Promotion and Tenure Representative to the College of Arts and Sciences, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2012-2013.
  11. Promotion and Tenure Representative to the Science Area for the College of Arts and Sciences, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2012-present.
  12. External Member, Philosophy Department Chair Selection Committee, Florida State University, College of Arts and Sciences, 2012-2013.
  13. At-Large Member, Faculty Senate, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2011-2012.
  14. Member, Faculty Evaluation Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2010-2011.
  15. Reviewer, Council on Faculty Research Support (COFRS), 2009.
  16. Promotion and Tenure Representative to the University, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2004-2005
  17. Promotion and Tenure Representative to the College of Arts and Sciences, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2004-2005.
  18. Promotion and Tenure Representative to the Science Area for the College of Arts and Sciences, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2004-2005.
  19. Member, Chair Selection Advisory Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2007-present.
  20. SACS/SMALCS Departmental Representative, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2006-2008.
  21. Member, Portfolio Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2005-present.
  22. External Member, Mathematics Department Chair Selection Committee, Florida State University, College of Arts and Sciences, 2004-2005.
  23. Member, Faculty Recruitment Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2001-2005.
  24. Chair, Teaching Evaluation Committee (a advisory committee to the Faculty Evaluation Committee), Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2003-2005.
  25. Member, Faculty Evaluation Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2002-2003.
  26. Chair, Faculty Recruitment Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2001-2003.
  27. Member, Computational Science and Information Technology (CSIT) Educational Graduate Program Committee, Florida State University, College of Arts and Sciences, 2001-Present.
  28. External Member, Statistics Department Chair Selection Committee, Florida State University, College of Arts and Sciences, 2001-Present.
  29. Member, CSIT Computational Biology Search Committee, Florida State University, School of Computational Science and Information Technology, 2001-Present.
  30. Associate Member, Security and Assurance in Information Technology Laboratory, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2000-Present.
  31. Member, CSIT Computational Biology Committee, Florida State University, School of Computational Science and Information Technology, 2001-Present.
  32. Chair, NSF/CISE Research Infrastructure Grant Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2000-2001.
  33. Chair, COP 4531 Course Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1999-Present.
  34. Member, Faculty Evaluation Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2000-2001.
  35. Member, Information Security Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 2000-Present.
  36. Member, Graduate Affairs Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1999-2002.
  37. Member, Equipment Committee, Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1999-2002.
  38. Chair, COP 4530 Course Committee,  Florida State University, Department of Computer Science, 1999-2000.
  39. Member, Biological Computing Committee, Florida State University, 1999-2000.
  40. Member, Sloan Bioinformatics Proposal Curriculum Committee, Florida State University, 1999-2000.
  41. Member, School of Mathematical Sciences Council, University of Southern Mississippi, 1997-99.
  42. Library Liaison, Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing, University of Southern Mississippi, 1997-99.
  43. Chair, Qualifying  Examination Committee, Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing, University of Southern Mississippi, 1997-99.
  44. Chair, Graduate Admissions Committee, Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing, University of Southern Mississippi, 1997-99.
  45. Graduate Advisor for 12-15 students per semester, Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing, University of Southern Mississippi, 1997-99.
  46. Chair, Mathematics Department Faculty Search Committee, University of Southern Mississippi, 1997-98.
  47. External Advisory Committee Member evaluating SUNY-Brockport's Masters Program in Computational Science, 1997.

University/NIST Service:

  1. Computer Science Representative the the National Science Foundation Transdisciplinary Research In Principles Of Data Science (TRIPODS) proposal effort at FSU, 2016-2017.
  2. Host to Prof. Siegfried Rump, Departement Informatik, Universität Hamburg, Germany, seminar speaker for the Applied and Computational Mathematics Division, Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute for Standards and Technology, 2015.
  3. Host to Prof. Emmanuel Gobet, Centre de Mathématiques Appliquées, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France, seminar speaker for the Applied and Computational Mathematics Division, Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute for Standards and Technology, 2014.
  4. Host to Prof. Yaohang Li, Department of Computer Science, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, seminar speaker for the Applied and Computational Mathematics Division, Information Technology Laboratory, National Institute for Standards and Technology, 2014.
  5. Recruiting trip to the Mathematics and Computer Sciences Department at Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, Fall 2013.
  6. Recruiting trip to the Mathematics and Computer Sciences Department at University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, Fall 2012
  7. Recruiting trip to the Mathematics and Computer Sciences Department at Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, Fall 2012.
  8. Recruiting trip to the Mathematics and Computer Sciences Department at Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, Spring 2012.
  9. Member, Advanced Topic Exam Committee for Mr. Yongjae Cha entitled "Finding Hypergeometric Solutions of Linear Recurrence Equations," Department of Mathematics, Florida State University, 2008.
  10. Coordinator of a Florida State University Research Booth at SC07 (Annual International High-Performance Computing and Networking Meeting), School of Computational Science, Florida State University, 2007, Reno, NV.
  11. Coordinator of a Florida State University Research Booth at SC06 (Annual International High-Performance Computing and Networking Meeting), School of Computational Science, Florida State University, 2006, Tampa, FL.
  12. Coordinator of a Florida State University Research Booth at SC2004 (Annual International High-Performance Computing and Networking Meeting), School of Computational Science, Florida State University, 2004, Pittsburgh, PA.
  13. Organizing a National Computational Science Institute special workshop on "Monte Carlo Methods as Educational Tools," at the School of Computational Science, Summer, 2005, School of Computational Science and Information Technology, Florida State University, 2005.  This workshop will be held immediately before the 5th IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, and will lead into an "Educational Program" for the conference, to be held at Florida State University, May 16-20, 2005.
  14. Departmental doctoral graduation representative:  hooded doctoral candidate Hongmei Chi, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, Summer 2004.
  15. Organized and hosted a National Computational Science Institute "Second Look Workshop" at the School of Computational Science and Information Technology, Summer, 2004, School of Computational Science and Information Technology, Florida State University, 2004.
  16. Host to Russel Caflisch, seminar speaker for the 2003-2004 CSIT/MARTECH Seminar Series on Computational Materials Science, School of Computational Science and Information Technology, 2004.
  17. Host to Peter Cummings, seminar speaker for the 2003-2004 CSIT/MARTECH Seminar Series on Computational Materials Science, School of Computational Science and Information Technology, 2004.
  18. Host to Robert V. Kohn, seminar speaker for the 2003-2004 CSIT/MARTECH Seminar Series on Computational Materials Science, School of Computational Science and Information Technology, 2004.
  19. Host to Mark Stiles, seminar speaker for the 2003-2004 CSIT/MARTECH Seminar Series on Computational Materials Science, School of Computational Science and Information Technology, 2003.
  20. Host to Rajiv Kalia, seminar speaker for the 2003-2004 CSIT/MARTECH Seminar Series on Computational Materials Science, School of Computational Science and Information Technology, 2003.
  21. Organizer for the 2003-2004 CSIT/MARTECH Seminar Series on Computational Materials Science, School of Computational Science and Information Technology, 2003-2004.
  22. Florida State University Coordinator for the Falls Creek Falls Workshop on Computational Science for Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Partner Universities, 2003.
  23. Coordinator of a Florida State University Research Booth at SC2003 (Annual International High-Performance Computing and Networking Meeting), School of Computational Science and Information Technology, Florida State University, 2003, Phoenix, AZ.
  24. Departmental doctoral graduation representative:  hooded doctoral candidates Han-Ku Lee, Sangmi Lee, Yaohang Li, and Sang Boem Lim, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, Summer 2003.
  25. Organized and hosted the National Computational Science Institute "Second Look Workshop" at the School of Computational Science and Information Technology, August 3-9, for 25 undergraduate faculty from various Southeastern Colleges and Universities, and the two instructors from the Shodor Educational Foundation, School of Computational Science and Information Technology, Florida State University, 2003.
  26. Host to Dr. Stephen L. Scott, colloquium speaker from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, 2003.
  27. Trip to San Diego, CA to attend the 2003 NPACI (National Partnership for Computational Infrastructure) All Hands Meeting and to explore ways to foster cooperation between FSU and NPACI and the San Diego Supercomputer Center.
  28. Host to Dr. Duncan Buell, colloquium speaker from the University of South Carolina, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, 2003.
  29. Host to Ms. Xiaosong Ma, faculty candidate from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, 2003.
  30. Host to Mr. Ting Yu, faculty candidate from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, 2003.
  31. Host to Prof. Abdujabar Rasulov, visiting Fulbright Scholar from University of World Economy and Diplomacy, Tashkent, Uzbekistan, at the School of Computational Science and Information Technology, Florida State University, 2002-2003.
  32. Coordinator of a Florida State University Research Booth at SC2002 (Annual International High-Performance Computing and Networking Meeting), School of Computational Science and Information Technology, Florida State University, 2002, Baltimore, MD.
  33. Host to Dr. Ashok Srinivasan, faculty candidate from the University of California, Santa Barbara, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, 2001.
  34. Trip to Melbourne, FL to meet with researchers at Harris Corporation with members of the Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, 2000.
  35. Trip to Deland, FL to recruit graduate students for the Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, 1999.
  36. Trip to Bethesda, MD to recruit Dr. Mark Boguski to the Florida State University Bioinformatics External Advisors Committee, 1999.

Administration:

  1. Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Computer Science, Florida State University, 2008-2014.
  2. Coordinator, Doctoral Program in Scientific Computing, University of Southern Mississippi, 1997-1999.
  3. Director, University of Southern Mississippi's Programming Environment and Training Research activities at the Naval Oceanographic Office at Stennis Space Center, MS, 1997-1999.

Service to International Organizations:

  1. Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) Visiting Lecturer, 1999-Present.
  2. Member, Board of Directors, International Association for Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (IMACS), 2005-Present.
  3. Member, Technical Committee on Monte Carlo Methods, International Association for Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (IMACS), 2005-Present.
  4. Member, Peer Review Committee for the Fulbright Specialist Program, Council for International Exchange of Scholars, Washington, DC, 2013-Present.
  5. Internal Reviewer, Grant Proposals, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Information Technology Laboratory, Gaithersburg, MD, 2015-Present.
  6. External Reviewer for the European Commission's Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) Program through the Bulgarian National Science Fund, Sofia, Bulgaria, 2014-Present.
  7. External Reviewer for the Oak Ridge Associated Universities/Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORAU/ORISE) Technology Commercialization Proposals, 2014-Present.
  8. External Reviewer, Case of  Dr. Madalina Deaconu's Promotion to Directrice de Recherche, Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (INRIA), Project Tosca, 2016, Nancy, France.
  9. External Reviewer, Case of  Dr. Madalina Deaconu's Promotion to Directrice de Recherche, Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (INRIA), Project Tosca, 2015, Nancy, France.
  10. External Reviewer, Case of  Dr. Calvin J. Ribben's Promotion to Professor, Department of Computer Science, Virginia Polytechnique and State University, 2012, Blacksburg, VA.
  11. External Reviewer, Case of  Dr. Sergei Shabanov's Promotion to Professor, University of Delaware, Department of Mathematics, 2012, Gainesville, FL.
  12. External Reviewer, Case of  Dr. Michela Taufer's Promotion to Associate Professor with Tenure, University of Delaware, Department of Computer and Information Sciences, 2011, Newark, DE.
  13. Member, International Program Committee for the International Conference on Computational Science 2016 (ICCS 2017), 2017, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich, Switzerland.
  14. Member, Review Committee for the 2016 Cray/Fernbach Award Committee to be given at SC16, , 2016, Salt Lake City, UT.
  15. Organizer, SC16 Half-Day Workshop entitled Numerical Reproducibility at Exascale (NRE2016), held at SC16, 2016, Salt Lake City, UT.
  16. Member, Review Committee for the 2015 Cray/Fernbach Award Committee to be given at SC15, 2015,  Austin, TX.
  17. Organizer, SC15 Half-Day Workshop entitled Numerical Reproducibility at Exascale (NRE2015), held at SC15, 2015, Austin, TX.
  18. Organizer of a four-session minisymposium on "Monte Carlo Methods for Solving Partial Differential Equations," with Dr. Wei Cai, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, at the Ninth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM 2015), 2015, Beijing, China.
  19. Member, Advisory Committee, The International Conference on High Performance Computing  & Simulation (HPCS 2016), 2016, Innsbruck, Austria.
  20. Member, International Program Committee for the International Conference on Computational Science 2016 (ICCS 2016), 2016,  San Diego, CA.
  21. Member, International Program Committee for the International Conference on Computational Science 2015 (ICCS 2015), 2015,  Reykjavik, Iceland.
  22. Member, International Program Committee for the International Conference on Computational Science 2014 (ICCS 2014), 2014,  Cairns, Australia.
  23. Member, Technical Program Committee, SC14, New Orleans, LA.
  24. Member, Emerging Technology Committee, SC14, New Orleans, LA.
  25. Member, Organizing Committee for the Fourth International Conference on Large Scale Scientific Computation (LSSC-2013), 2013, Sozopol, Bulgaria.
  26. Member, International Program Committee for the Ninth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods (MCM2013), 2013, Annecy, France.
  27. Member, International Program Committee for the International Conference on Computational Science 2013 (ICCS 2013), 2013, Barcelona, Spain.
  28. Member, International Program Committee for the 27th International Conference on Supercomputing (ICS 2013), 2013, Eugene, OR
  29. Member, International Program Committee for the 21st High Performance Computing Symposium (HPC 2013), 2013, San Diego, CA.
  30. Member, Steering Committee, SC12, Salt Lake City, UT.
  31. Member, Technical Program Committee, SC12, Salt Lake City, UT.
  32. Member, Birds of a Feather (BOF) Committee, SC12, Salt Lake City, UT.
  33. Member, Review Committee for the George Michael Memorial Graduate Fellowships given at SC12, Salt Lake City, UT.
  34. Member, Technical Program Committee, SC11, Seattle, WA.
  35. Member, Review Committee for the George Michael Memorial Graduate Fellowships given at SC11, Seattle, WA.
  36. External Reviewer, Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung (SNSF, Swiss National Science Foundation); Division II: Mathematics, Natural and Engineering Sciences, Computer Science Proposal, 2014, Bern, Switzerland.
  37. Member, National Science Foundation Software Task Force, SSE Software for Science and Engineering, 2010-present, Arlington, VA.
  38. Member, Review Panel, Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung (Austrian Science Fund), DK-Plus (Doctoral Programs Plus) Review, 2010, Vienna Austria.
  39. External Reviewer, Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung (Austrian Science Fund), Stand-Alone Project Review, 2010, Vienna Austria.
  40. External Reviewer, New Researchers Start-up Program of Fonds québécois de la recherche sur la nature et les technologies (FQRNT), 2009, Québec, Canada.
  41. Member, International Program Committee for the International Conference on Computational Science 2012 (ICCS 2012), 2012, Omaha, NE.
  42. Member, International Program Committee for the 20th High Performance Computing Symposium (HPC 2012), 2012, Orlando, FL.
  43. Member, Program Committee for High Performance Computing and Simulation 2011 (HPCS 2011), which is part of the SCS Spring Simulation MultiConference, 2011, Boston, Massachusetts.
  44. Member, International Program Committee for the International Conference on Computational Science 2011 (ICCS 2011), 2011, Tsukuba, Japan.
  45. Member, Program Committee for High Performance Computing and Simulation 2010 (HPCS 2010), which is part of the SCS Spring MultiConference, 2010, Orlando, Florida.
  46. Member, International Program Committee for the Workshop on High-performance Computing Applied to Finance to be held in conjunction with  the 16th International European Conference on Parallel and Distributed Computing (Euro-Par 2010), 2010, Ischia, Italy.
  47. Member, International Program Committee for the International Conference on Computational Science 2010 (ICCS 2010), 2010, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  48. Member, International Program Committee for the 2010 International Conference on Computational Science and its Applications (ICCSA 2010), 2010, Fukuoka, Japan.
  49. Member, Educational Committee, SC09: International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, 2009, Portland, OR.
  50. Member, International Program Committee for the International Conference on Computational Science 2009 (ICCS 2009), 2009, Baton Rouge, LA.
  51. Member, International Program Committee for the Sixth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods (MCM2009), 2009, Brussels, Belgium.
  52. Member, Program Committee for International Parallel and Distributed Computing (IPDPS) 2009, Rome, Italy.
  53. Member, Program Committee for High Performance Computing 2009 (HPC 2009), which is part of the SCS Spring MultiConference, 2009, San Diego, CA.
  54. Member, International Program Committee for the 2007 International Conference on Computational Science and its Applications (ICCSA 2008), 2008, Perugia, Italy.
  55. Member, Educational Committee, SC08: International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, 2008, Austin, TX.
  56. Organizer of a minisymposium entitled "Parallel Stochastic Methods in Computational Biology," at the 13th SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing (PP08), 2008, Atlanta, GA.
  57. Member, Program Committee for High Performance Computing and Simulation 2008 (HPCS 2008), which is part of the SCS Spring MultiConference, 2008, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
  58. External Reviewer, Habilitation of Dr. Sylvain Maire, Assistant Professor, Université de Toulon et du Var, Institut des Sciences de l'Ingénieur de Toulon et du Var, Modélisation Numérique et Couplages, 2007, Toulon, France.
  59. Organizer of two invited minisymposia on "Stochastic Computing and Applications," with Dr. Wesley Petersen, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich, Switzerland, at the Sixth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM 2007), 2007, Zürich, Switzerland.
  60. Organizer of an minisymposium on "Probabilistic Numerical Methods for PDEs and Stochastic PDEs," with Dr. Wesley Petersen, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich, Switzerland, at the Sixth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM 2007), 2007, Zürich, Switzerland.
  61. Member, International Program Committee for the Sixth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods (MCM2007), 2007, Reading, United Kingdom.
  62. Member, International Program Committee for The 2007 IEEE International Symposium on Bioinformatics and Life Science Computing (BLSC07), 2007, Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada.
  63. Member, International Program Committee for the International Conference on Computational Science 2007 (ICCS 2007), 2007, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
  64. Member, International Program Committee for the 2007 International Conference on Computational Science and its Applications (ICCSA 2007), 2007, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
  65. Member, Review Panel, Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung (Austrian Science Fund), Doktoralskolleg (Doctoral Program) Review, 2006, Vienna Austria.
  66. External Reviewer, Promotion Case of  Dr. Sharam Rahimi to Associate Professor, Southern Illinois University, Department of Computer Science, 2006, Carbondale, IL.
  67. External Reviewer, Promotion Case of  Dr. David R. C. Hill to Professor, Grade 2, Blaise Pascal University, Department of Computer Science, 2006, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
  68. External Reviewer, Promotion and Tenure Case of  Dr. Peter R. Kramer to Associate Professor with Tenure, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Mathematical Sciences, 2005, Troy, NY.
  69. Member, International Program Committee for the International Conference on Computational Science 2006 (ICCS 2006), 2005, Reading, UK.
  70. Member, National Institutes of Health Study Section Committee for Software Development and Maintenance Applications, 2005.  
  71. Member, International Program Committee for Computational Finance 2006, 2006, London, UK.
  72. Member, International Program Committee for the 2006 High Performance Computing Symposium (HPC 2006), 2006, Huntsville, AL.
  73. Member, Program Committee for The Seventh International Conference on Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing (MCQMC-06), Ulm, Germany.
  74. Organizer and General Chair, Fifth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, 2005, Tallahassee, FL.
  75. Mail reviewer for Cooperative Grants Program of the U.S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF),  2005.
  76. Member, Scientific Advisory Committee for the Second International Conference on Computational Finance and Its Applications 2006, Imperial College, London, UK.
  77. Organizer, Workshop entitled Parallel Monte Carlo Algorithms for Diverse Applications in a Distributed Setting, at the International Conference on Computational Science 2005 (ICCS 2005), Atlanta, GA.
  78. Member, International Program Committee for the 2005 International Conference on Computational Science and its Applications (ICCSA 2005), 2005, Singapore.
  79. Member, Program Committee for The International Workshop on High Performance Computing in Medicine and Biology (HiPCoMB-05), to be held in conjunction with The 11th Conference on Parallel and Distributed Systems (ICPADS-05), Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Japan.
  80. Member, Program Committee for The Third International Workshop on Biomedical Computations on the Grid (BioGrid'05) held in conjunction with CCGrid2005, 2005, Cardiff, Wales, UK.
  81. Member, International Program Committee for The First Open International Conference on Modeling and Simulation, 2005, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
  82. External Member, Promotion Committee of  Dr. Louise Perkins to Professor, University of Southern Mississippi, Department of Computer Science and Statistics, 2004, Hattiesburg, MS.
  83. External Member, Promotion Committee of  Dr. Marios Dikaiakos to Associate Professor with tenure, University of Cyprus, Department of Computer Science, 2004, Nicosia, Cyprus.
  84. Member, International Program Committee for the International Conference on Computational Science 2005 (ICCS 2005), 2005, Atlanta, GA.
  85. Member, International Program Committee for the 2005 High Performance Computing Symposium (HPC 2005), 2005, San Diego, CA.
  86. Organizer, Minsyposium entitled Monte Carlo Computations in Biology and Materials Science , at the 2005 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Computational Science and Engineering Conference, Orlando, FL.
  87. External peer reviewer for Dr. Marcin Paprzycki's promotion to Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, Oklahoma State University, 2003, Stillwater, OK.
  88. Member, Program Committee for the Second International Workshop on Biomedical Computations on the Grid (BioGrid'04) held in conjunction with CCGrid2004, 2004, Chicago, Illinois.
  89. Mail reviewer for Cooperative Grants Program of the U.S. Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF), October, 2003.
  90. Member, International Program Committee for the 2004 International Conference on Computational Science and its Applications (ICCSA 2004), 2004, Santa Maria degli Angeli of Assisi (Perugia), Italy.
  91. Member, International Program Committee for 2004 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS 2004), 2004, Kraków, Poland.
  92. Organizer of a minisymposium on "Fault Tolerant High-Performance Computing," with Dr. Ashok Srinivasan of the Department of Computer Science at Florida State University at the Eleventh Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, 2004, San Francisco, CA.
  93. External peer reviewer for Dr. Olivier Smidts' tenure case for the Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Métrologie Nucléaire, Brussels, Belgium, 2002.
  94. Organizer of three invited minisymposia on "Stochastic Computing and Applications," with Dr. Wesley Petersen, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich, Switzerland, at the Fifth International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ICIAM 2003), 2003, Sydney, Australia.
  95. Member, International Program Committee for 2003 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS 2003), 2003, St. Petersburg, Russia/Melbourne, Australia.
  96. Member, Program Committee for the First International Workshop on Biomedical Computations on the Grid (BioGrod'03) held in conjunction with CCGrid2003, 2003, Tokyo, Japan.
  97. Member, International Program Committee for the Fourth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, 2003, Berlin, Germany.
  98. Member, Organizing Committee for the Fourth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, 2003, Berlin, Germany.
  99. Member, Organizing Committee for the Fourth International Conference on Large Scale Scientific Computation (ICLSSC-2003), 2003, Sozopol, Bulgaria.
  100. Member, Program Committee for the 2003 International Conference on Computational Science and Its Applications (ICCSA 2003), 2003, Montreal, Canada.
  101. Member, International Program Committee for 2002 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS 2002), 2002, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
  102. Member, International Program Committee for the Fifth International Conference on Numerical Methods and Applications, 2002, Borovets, Bulgaria.
  103. Panelist for NSF, Information Technology Research, April 2001, Arlington, VA.
  104. Mail reviewer for the State of Kansas EPSCoR Defense Program, June, 2000.
  105. Mail reviewer for NSF, Division of Mathematical Sciences, June 2000.
  106. Member, International Program Committee for the Second IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, June, 1999, Varna, Bulgaria.
  107. Member, Organizing Committee for the First Southern Symposium on Computing, December, 1998, Hattiesburg, MS.
  108. Panelist for NSF, CISE/CCR, December 1998, Arlington, VA.
  109. Chairman, Organizing Committee Chair for a Programming Environment and Training Workshop entitled "High-Performance Monte Carlo Tools'', April 23-24, 1998, Stennis Space Center, MS.
  110. Member, Organizing Committee Member for the Seventh SIAM Conference on Parallel Processing for Scientific Computing, March, 1995, San Francisco, CA.

Service to Industry and Government:

  1. Consultant, Imarcsgroup.com, LLC, Tallahassee, FL, 2010-Present.
  2. Consultant, The Florida Lottery, Tallahassee, FL, 2007-Present.
  3. Consultant, The Mathworks (producers of Matlab), Natick, MA, 2007-Present.
  4. Consultant, Züricher Kantonalbank (ZKB), Zürich, Switzerland, 2005-Present.
  5. Consultant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge, TN, 2003-Present.
  6. Member, Scientific Advisory Board, PDH International Incorporated, Hallandale, FL, 2002-Present.
  7. Consultant, PDH International Incorporated, Hallandale, FL, 2001-Present.
  8. Consultant, Bettis Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA, 1999-Present.
  9. Consultant, Arthur. D. Little, Cambridge, MA, 1999.
  10. Consultant, Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, Stennis Space Center, MS, 1997-1999.

Security Clearances Held:

  1. Department of Energy L Clearance, 2000-2002.
  2. Department of Energy Q Clearance, 1999.
  3. Department of Defense Top Secret Clearance, 1990-1996, 1997-1999.

Service to Local Organizations:

  1. Member, Board of Directors, The Artist Series, Tallahassee, FL, 2009-Present.
  2. President, Board of Directors, The Artist Series, Tallahassee, FL, 2011-2014.
  3. Member, Board of Directors, The Big Bend Community Orchestra, Tallahassee, FL, 2009-2012.
  4. President, Board of Directors, Big Bend Community Orchestra, Tallahassee, FL, 2009-2010.
  5. Assistant Scout Master, Boy Scouts of America Troop 463, Garrett Park, MD, 2015-Present.
  6. Member, Troop Committee, Boy Scouts of America Troop 118, Tallahassee, FL, 2002-Present.
  7. Member, Pack Committee, Boy Scouts of America Cub Pack 521, Garrett Park, MD, 2014-2015.
  8. Member, Orchestra Committee, First Violin Section, Big Bend Community Orchestra, Tallahassee, FL, 2000-2012.
  9. Member, First Violin Section, Symphony of the Potomac, Silver Spring, MD, 2014-Present.
  10. Member Messiah Accompaniment Orchestra, First Violin Section, Tallahassee, FL, 1999-2004.
  11. Member, Troop Committee, Boy Scouts of America Troop 684, Zürich, Switzerland, 2005-2006.
  12. Member, Tenor Section, Lehrergesangverein Zürich (www.lgz-zh.ch), Zürich, Switzerland, 2005-2006.
  13. Member, First Violin Section, Orchesterverein Zürich (www.ovz.ch), Zürich, Switzerland, 2005-2006.
  14. Member, First Violin Section, Neumunster Orchester Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland, 2006.
  15. Concertmaster, Big Bend Community Orchestra, Tallahassee, FL, 2000-2004, 2006-2010.
  16. Concertmaster,  Immanuel Baptist Church, Tallahassee, FL, Easter 2007.
  17. Member 20th Century Krewe, Springtime Tallahassee, Tallahassee, FL, 2000-2005.
  18. Assistant Chair, Popcorn Committee, Boy Scouts of America Troop 118, Tallahassee, FL, 2004-2005.
  19. Member, Pit Orchestra for Rodger's and Hammerstein's Carousel, Brookwood School, Thomasville, GA, 2003.
  20. Member, Universitätsorchester Salzburg (University of Salzburg Orchestra), Salzburg, Austria, Sommersemester 2002.
  21. Advancement Chairman, Cub Scouts of America Pack 114, Gilchrist Elementary School, Tallahassee, FL, 2000-2001.

Editorial and Reviewing Service:

  1. Member, Editorial Board for ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (ACM TOMS), 2014-Present.
  2. Member, Editorial Board for Molecular Based Mathematical Biology, 2012-Present.
  3. Member, Editorial Board for Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2005-Present.
  4. Member, Editorial Board for Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2000-Present.
  5. Member, Editorial Board for Advances in Computing, Theory and Practice, 1998-Present.
  6. Guest Editor, Special Issue of Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, based on papers from our Numerical Reproducibility at Exascale workshops: NRE2015 and NRE2016, 2017.
  7. Member, Editorial Board for SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, 2008-2011.
  8. Guest Editor, Special Issue of Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, volume 80(6), 2010.
  9. Reviewer for Mathematical Reviews, 1995-Present.
  10. Textbook reviewer for Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG., 2012-Present.
  11. Textbook reviewer for Springer Verlag, 2009-Present.
  12. Textbook reviewer for McGraw-Hill, Inc., 2005-Present.
  13. Textbook reviewer for John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2004-Present.
  14. External Journal Reviewer for the proposed Journal of Computational Science and Engineering for Birkhauser, Basel, Switzerland, 2003.
  15. Book Reviewer for The Journal of Statistical Physics, Mathematics of Computation, and Connection Science, 1989.

Refereeing Service:

  1. Journal of Computational Physics, 2016
  2. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2016
  3. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS), 2016
  4. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2015
  5. ACM Transactions on Modeling and Computer Simulation (TOMACS), 2015
  6. Kuwait Journal of Science, 2015
  7. Journal of Computational Science, 2015
  8. Numerical Reproducibility at Exascale 2015 (NRE2015), 2015
  9. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2015
  10. Washington Editorial Review Board, 2015
  11. Journal of Computational Physics, 2015
  12. ACM Transactions on Modeling and Computer Simulation (TOMACS), 2015
  13. Journal of Inverse and Ill-Posed Problems, 2015
  14. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS), 2015
  15. Nonlinear Theory and Its Applications, Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers (IEICE, Japan), 2015
  16. Applied Mathematical Modelling, 2015
  17. Journal of Inverse and Ill-Posed Problems, 2015
  18. Journal of Computational Physics, 2015
  19. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 2015ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software, 2015
  20. Computing in Science and Engineering (CiSE), 2015
  21. The 2014 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), 2015
  22. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS), 2015
  23. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 2015
  24. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS), 2014
  25. ESAIM: Proceedings and Surveys, 2014
  26. Journal of Computational Science, 2014
  27. BIT Numerical Mathematics, 2014
  28. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 2014
  29. Washington Editorial Review Board, 2014
  30. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2014
  31. ESAIM: Proceedings and Surveys, 2014
  32. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2014
  33. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS), 2014
  34. Applied Mathematical Modeling, 2014
  35. BIT Numerical Mathematics, 2014
  36. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS), 2014
  37. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS), 2014
  38. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2014
  39. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software, 2014
  40. Journal of Computational Physics, 2014
  41. Nonlinear Analysis Real World Applications, 2014
  42. Communications in Statistics - Simulation and Computation, 2014
  43. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2014
  44. BIT Numerical Mathematics, 2014
  45. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS), 2014
  46. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2014
  47. The 2014 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), 2014
  48. Physica Scripta, 2014
  49. Communications in Statistics - Simulation and Computation, 2014
  50. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2013
  51. Journal of Scientific Computing, 2013
  52. Ninth International Conference on Large Scale Scientific Computation (LSSC-2013), 2013
  53. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2013
  54. Concurrency and Computation: Practice and Experience, 2013
  55. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2013
  56. Ninth International Conference on Large Scale Scientific Computation (LSSC-2013), 2013
  57. SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, 2013
  58. ACM Transactions on Modeling and Computer Simulation (TOMACS), 2013
  59. Ninth International Conference on Large Scale Scientific Computation (LSSC-2013), 2013
  60. Parallel Computing, 2013
  61. The 2013 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), 2013
  62. 27th International Conference on Supercomuting (ICS 2013), 2013
  63. SIAM Review, 2013
  64. 21st High Performance Computing Symposium (HPC 2013), 2013
  65. Journal of Computational Physics, 2013
  66. SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, 2013
  67. Journal of Computational Neuroscience, 2013
  68. ACM Transactions on Modeling and Computer Simulation (TOMACS), 2012
  69. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2012
  70. Journal of Computational Physics, 2012
  71. SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, 2012
  72. Physica A, 2012
  73. Applied Mathematics and Computation, 2012
  74. Physica A, 2012
  75. Communications in Statistics, Simulation and Computation, 2012
  76. SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, 2012
  77. Journal of Computational Physics, 2012
  78. The Journal of Electrostatics, 2012
  79. The 2012 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), 2012
  80. 20th High Performance Computing Symposium (HPC 2012), 2012
  81. Advances in Engineering Software, 2011
  82. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2011
  83. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2011
  84. Applications and Applied Mathematics, 2011
  85. 19th High Performance Computing Symposium (HPC 2011), 2011
  86. Le Matematiche, 2010
  87. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2010
  88. Le Matematiche, 2010
  89. Journal of Chemical Physics, 2010
  90. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2010
  91. Journal of the Franklin Institute, 2010
  92. Journal of Computational Physics, 2010
  93. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2010
  94. Journal of Computational Physics, 2010
  95. The Journal of Heat Transfer (a Journal of the ASME), 2010
  96. Modélisation et Mathématique et Analyse Numérique, 2010
  97. The Journal of Heat Transfer (a Journal of the ASME), 2010
  98. The 2010 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), 2010
  99. High Performance Computing Symposium 2010 (HPC 2010), 2010
  100. Journal of Computational Physics, 2009
  101. Modélisation et Mathématique et Analyse Numérique, 2009
  102. The 2009 International Conference on Computational Science and its Applications (ICCSA), 2009
  103. Physical Review, 2009
  104. The 2009 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), 2009
  105. High Performance Computing Symposium 2009 (HPC 2009), 2009
  106. International Parallel and Distributed Computing (IPDPS), 2009
  107. Information Sciences, 2008
  108. Journal of Computational Physics, 2008
  109. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2008
  110. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2008
  111. Communications in Applied Mathematics and Computational Science, 2008
  112. SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, 2008
  113. Journal of Computational Physics, 2008
  114. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2008
  115. The 2008 International Conference on Computational Science and its Applications (ICCSA), 2008
  116. Computing in Science & Engineering, 2008
  117. High Performance Computing and Simulation 2008 (HPCS 2008), 2008
  118. Journal of Computational Neuroscience, 2008
  119. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2007
  120. Journal of Computational Physics, 2007
  121. Journal of Computational Neuroscience, 2007
  122. SIAM Journal on Numerical Analysis, 2007
  123. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2007
  124. SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, 2007
  125. Computational Statistics and Data Analysis, 2007
  126. The 2007 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), 2007
  127. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2006
  128. Parallel Computing, 2006
  129. Physical Review E, 2006
  130. Parallel Processing Letters, 2006
  131. Parallel and Distributed Computing, a workshop of The 2006 International Conference on Computational Science and its Applications, 2006
  132. The 2006 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), 2006
  133. The 2006 International Conference on Computational Science and its Applications (ICCSA), 2006
  134. The International Workshop on High Performance Computing in Medicine and Biology 2006, 2006
  135. Computational Finance 2006, 2006
  136. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2006
  137. 2006 High Performance Computing Symposium, 2006
  138. Computer Physics Communications, 2006
  139. Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, 2006
  140. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2006
  141. Second International Conference on Computational Finance and Its Applications 2006
  142. The Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 2005
  143. Journal of Computational Physics, 2005
  144. The International Workshop on High Performance Computing in Medicine and Biology 2005, 2005
  145. Pattern Recognition Letters, 2005
  146. Journal of Computational Physics, 2005
  147. SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, 2005
  148. The 2005 International Conference on Computational Science and its Applications (ICCSA), 2005
  149. The 2005 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), 2005
  150. The Third International Workshop on Biomedical Computations on the Grid, 2005
  151. SIAM Journal on Scientific Computing, 2005
  152. Journal of Computational Physics, 2005
  153. Parallel Computing, 2005
  154. Pattern Recognition Letters, 2005
  155. 2005 High Performance Computing Symposium, 2005
  156. Journal of Computational Physics, 2004
  157. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 2004
  158. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software, 2004
  159. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2004
  160. Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations, 2004
  161. Journal of Computational Physics, 2004
  162. The Fourth IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, 2004
  163. Monte Carlo Methods and Applications, 2004
  164. The 2004 International Conference on Computational Science and its Applications (ICCSA), 2004
  165. The 2004 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), 2004
  166. IEEE SoutheastCon 2004, 2004
  167. Fourth International Conference on Large-Scale Scientific Computations, 2003
  168. IEEE Internet Computing, 2003
  169. The 2003 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), 2003
  170. Future Generation Computer Systems, 2003
  171. Fifth International Conference on Numerical Methods and Applications, 2003
  172. 16th Annual ACM International Conference on Supercomputing, 2003
  173. Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 2003
  174. Parallel Processing Letters, 2003
  175. The 2002 International Conference on Computational Science (ICCS), 2002
  176. IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, 2002
  177. Third IMACS Seminar on Monte Carlo Methods, 2001
  178. Third International Conference on Large-Scale Scientific Computations, 2001
  179. Fourth International Conference on Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing, 2000
  180. Operations Research, 2000
  181. Parallel Algorithms and Applications, 2000
  182. IEEE Transactions on Computers, 2000
  183. 1999 ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing (SC '99), 1999
  184. Journal of Computational Neurosciences, 1999
  185. Parallel and Distributed Computing Practices, 1998
  186. The 12th Workshop on Parallel and Distributed Simulation, 1998
  187. ACM Transactions on Modeling and Computer Simulation, 1998
  188. Journal of the ACM, 1997
  189. Journal of Computational Physics, 1997
  190. Journal of Statistical Computation and Simulation, 1996
  191. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software, 1996
  192. 1995 ACM/IEEE Conference on Supercomputing (SC '95), 1995
  193. IEEE Computational Science and Engineering, 1995
  194. SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, 1995
  195. SIAM Journal on Scientific and Statistical Computing, 1995
  196. SIAM Journal on Scientific and Statistical Computing, 1995
  197. The Journal of Supercomputing, 1995
  198. The International Journal of High Speed Computing, 1995
  199. Connection Science, 1995
  200. Biological Cybernetics, 1995
  201. Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 1995
  202. The 8th International Parallel Processing Symposium, 1995
  203. The International Parallel Processing Symposium '95, 1995
  204. Computers and Mathematics with Applications, 1994
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